December 31, 2012

Mystery surrounds couple missing in Afghanistan

A pregnant American woman and her Canadian husband have not been heard from since Oct. 8.

By DENIS D. GRAY and ERIC TUCKER The Associated Press

KABUL - The family of an ailing, pregnant American woman missing in Afghanistan with her Canadian husband is making public appeals for the couple's safe return.

click image to enlarge

Caitlan Coleman, right, sits with her husband, Josh, in this undated photo provided by her father, James Coleman. The couple disappeared in Afghanistan in October.

The Associated Press

James Coleman, the father of 27-year-old Caitlan Coleman, said over the weekend that she was due to deliver in January and needed urgent medical attention for a liver ailment that required regular checkups. He said he and his wife, Lyn, last heard from their son-in-law, Josh, on Oct. 8 from an Internet cafe in what Josh described as an "unsafe" part of Afghanistan. The Colemans asked that Josh be identified by his first name only to protect his privacy.

The couple had embarked on a journey last July that took them to Russia, the central Asian countries of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, and then finally to Afghanistan.

Neither the Taliban nor any other militant group has claimed it is holding the couple, leading some to believe they were kidnapped. But no ransom demand has been made.

An Afghan official said their trail has gone cold.

"Our goal is to get them back safely and healthy," the father said by phone Friday night. "I don't know what kind of care they're getting or not getting. We're just an average family, and we don't have connections with anybody and we don't have a lot of money."

He made a similar appeal in a video posted on YouTube on Dec. 13.

"We appeal to whoever is caring for her to show compassion and allow Caity, Josh and our unborn grandbaby to come home," he said.

Before the video came out, the family had kept quiet about the case since the couple disappeared in early October. They appear to have broken their silence in hopes it might lead to a breakthrough.

But many questions remain over the disappearances. It is not known whether the couple is still alive or how or why they entered Afghanistan. And there is no information about what they were doing there before they vanished.

James Coleman, of York County, Pennsylvania, said he was not entirely sure what his daughter and her husband were doing in Afghanistan. But he surmised they may have been seeking to help Afghans by joining an aid group after touring the region. He described his daughter as "naive" and "adventuresome" with a humanitarian bent.

He said Josh did not disclose their exact location in his last email contact Oct. 8, saying only that they were not in a safe place. Coleman also said the last withdrawals from the couple's account were made Oct. 8 and 9 in Kabul, with no activity on the account and no further communication from them after that date.

"He just said they were heading into the mountains -- wherever that was, I don't know," the father said.

"They're both kind of naive, always have been in my view. Why they actually went to Afghanistan, I'm not sure... I assume it was more of the same, getting to know the local people, if they could find an NGO (nongovernmental organization) or someone they could work with in a little way."

Coleman said that, in general, they preferred small villages and communities because they felt safer there than in big cities, and that is where they wanted to focus their travels.

"I assume they were going to strike out on foot like they were doing," he said.

Both the U.S. State Department and Canadian Foreign Affairs Ministry say they are looking into the disappearance.

"Canada is pursuing all appropriate channels and officials are in close contact with local authorities," Canadian Foreign Affairs Ministry spokeswoman Chrystiane Roy said Friday, calling the incident a "possible kidnap."

(Continued on page 2)

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