July 3, 2013

Head of ousted president's party, deputy, arrested in Egypt

The Associated Press

(Continued from page 3)

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Opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi shout slogans and wave a national flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, on Wednesday. The Arabic says, "leave."

The Associated Press

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An Egyptian opposition protester is beaten by supporters of Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, as a main raises a brick overhead, in downtown Damietta, Egypt, on Wednesday.

The Associated Press

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Badr also called on the army to place Morsi under arrest for his alleged incitement to civil war.

"Today is the day of decisiveness," Badr said at a news conference.

Morsi's opponents say he has lost his legitimacy through mistakes and power grabs, and that their turnout on the streets shows the nation has turned against him.

On Tuesday, millions of jubilant, chanting Morsi opponents again filled Tahrir Square and avenues adjacent to two presidential palaces in the capital, and main squares in cities nationwide. After Morsi's speech, they erupted in indignation, banging metal fences to raise a din, some raising their shoes in the air in a show of contempt. "Leave, leave," they chanted.

The president's supporters also moved out in increased marches in Cairo and other cities, and stepped up warnings that it will take bloodshed to dislodge him. While Morsi has stuck to a stance that he is defending democracy in Egypt, many of his Islamist backers have presented the fight as one to protect Islam.

Fearing that Washington's most important Arab ally would descend into chaos, U.S. officials said they are urging Morsi to take immediate steps to address opposition grievances, telling the protesters to remain peaceful and reminding the army that a coup could have consequences for the massive American military aid package it receives. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

The army has insisted it has no intention to take power. But the reported road map showed it was ready to replace Morsi and make a sweeping change in the ramshackle political structure that has evolved since Mubarak's fall in February 2011.

The constitution and domination of the legislature after elections held in late 2011-early 2012 are two of the Islamists' and Brotherhood's most valued victories – along with Morsi's election last year.

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Supporters of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans during a rally in Nasser City, Cairo, Egypt, on Wednesday. The green card with Arabic reads, "stay where you are."

The Associated Press

  


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