July 15, 2013

Fla. town somberly absorbs Zimmerman verdict

The Associated Press

SANFORD, Fla. — Nearly 70 years after Jackie Robinson was run out of town, Sanford is absorbing what some see as another blow to race relations: the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the killing of Trayvon Martin.

click image to enlarge

In this Saturday, July 13, 2013 file photo, a mother holds and sits with her children after hearing the verdict of not guilty in the trial of neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman at the Seminole County Courthouse, in Sanford, Fla. Zimmerman was cleared of all charges Saturday in the shooting of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin, whose killing unleashed furious debate across the U.S. over racial profiling, self-defense and equal justice. Some view Zimmerman's acquittal as a blow to race relations. (AP Photo/Mike Brown, File)

click image to enlarge

Abdul Kebbeh, 6, holds a sign at Westlake Park on Sunday, July 14, 2013 in downtown Seattle. Hundreds of people gathered at Westlake and marched to the United States Court House to protest the acquittal of George Zimmerman, the Florida man that shot and killed Trayvon Martin.

The Associated Press

Additional Photos Below

Related headlines

Some black residents of this community of almost 50,000 people where the shooting took place say that while relations between black and white have improved over the years, progress has been slow and the Martin case demonstrated that problems persist.

James Tillman, who is black, said Saturday's verdict just adds to his mistrust of local authorities, who have been criticized over the years for their handling of other crimes against blacks. Tillman, 47, said city officials try to portray Sanford as a "quiet and laid-back town."

"This town here is one of the worst towns about covering things up," Tillman said, stopping his bike in front of a memorial to the 17-year-old Martin. "When you put something in the closet, it's going to burst back on you."

Sanford, a mostly middle-class suburb of Orlando, about 25 miles away, has reacted somberly — and peacefully — to the verdict. The city was mostly silent the morning after the verdict, in contrast to the rallies that drew thousands not long after the shooting.

Only a few people went past the permanent memorial built in the city's historically black Goldsboro neighborhood to honor the Miami teen.

Standing in front of the memorial, Venitta Robinson, the minister at Allen Chapel, said she hopes the black community doesn't dwell on the verdict.

"It's a little disheartening, but that was the process we go through as far as having a jury, and that's the verdict that they had, and we have to respect that," said Robinson, who is black. "We don't necessarily have to like it, but we have to respect it."

In just the 17 months since the killing, Sanford has changed: The city, which is about one-third black, now has a black police chief and its first black city manager.

Before the shooting, Sanford was best known for its antiques shops and as the southern terminus for Amtrak's Autotrain, which carries tourists and their cars between Florida and the Washington area.

The police department was heavily criticized for declining to charge Zimmerman at first, and he wasn't arrested until 44 days after the shooting, by order of a special prosecutor.

But the distrust between Sanford's city government and its black citizens predates the Martin case by several decades.

A large portion of the black community lives in Goldsboro, which was Florida's second city incorporated by African-Americans when it was founded in 1891. Tensions were inflamed when an expanding Sanford annexed Goldsboro in 1911.

In 1946, Sanford was the site of the botched start of Jackie Robinson's first steps toward breaking baseball's color barrier.

Robinson had been sent to Sanford for his first spring training with the Brooklyn Dodgers' minor-league Montreal Royals. Two days after he arrived, he was sent to the Dodgers' minor-league team in Daytona Beach after getting death threats from Sanford residents.

In 1997, on the 50th anniversary of Robinson's breaking into the majors, then-Sanford Mayor Larry Dale issued a proclamation apologizing for Robinson's treatment.

That tension has re-emerged in recent years because of several shootings of blacks and an attack on a black homeless man.

In 2010 Justin Collison, the 21-year-old son of a white Sanford police lieutenant, was videotaped leaving a bar and punching a homeless man named Sherman Ware in the back of the head, causing serious injuries.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors


Additional Photos

click image to enlarge

In this Saturday, July 13, 2013 file photo, Darrsie Jackson, center, reacts after hearing the verdict of not guilty in the trial of George Zimmerman, with her children Linzey Stafford, left, 10, and Shauntina Stafford, 11, at the Seminole County Courthouse, in Sanford, Fla. Zimmerman had been charged with the 2012 shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Nearly 70 years after Jackie Robinson was run out of town by the KKK, Sanford is absorbing what some see as another blow to race relations: Zimmerman's acquittal. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)

  


Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)