November 8, 2013

NY’s new World Trade Center the tallest? Only if you count the antenna

Chicago may hold onto the tallest building title if antenna of NY’s new World Trade Center not counted.

By Jason Keyser
Associated Press

(Continued from page 1)

click image to enlarge

The view of Chicago from “The Ledge,” at the 110 story, 1,450 foot Willis Tower. The glass balcony is suspended 1,353 feet in the air and juts out 4 feet from the Sears Tower’s 103rd floor Skydeck. Associated Press

Still, the Willis has a central place in Chicago’s history, speaking to the city’s own tradition of recovering from adversity ever since the 1871 Great Fire and its history of creating architectural marvels, said Peter Alter, an archivist at the Chicago History Museum.

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, headquartered in Chicago, also designed the Willis, which opened as Sears Tower in 1973 and remained the tallest building in the world until 1996 when the council ruled that the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, had knocked it from the top spot.

And the Willis can still claim to get visitors up higher: The highest occupied floor in the 1,450-foot (not including antenna height), 110-story Willis Tower is still higher up than that of the 104-story 1 World Trade Center.

At the Willis’ 103rd floor thrill-seekers can step out into one of the glass boxes known as The Ledge that extend outside the building’s steel frame and look straight down 1,353 feet.

In New York, the debate was upsetting to Jim Riches, a retired fire department deputy chief who lost his 29-year-old firefighter son, Jimmy, in the terrorist attack.

“You know what? I think it’s a ridiculous argument. It doesn’t matter to me what height it is,” he said. “You know, my son’s not going to walk back in that door again. And that’s the big thing. He’s gone.”

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