July 9, 2013

Pakistani report on Bin Laden blames negligence

Incompetence at nearly all levels of the government let the al-Qaida chief go undetected, the report says.

The Associated Press

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Al-Qaida founder Osama bin Laden was able to live in Pakistan undetected for nine years because of a breathtaking scale of negligence and incompetence at practically all levels of the Pakistani government, according to an official government report published by a TV channel Monday.

The 336-page report was written by a commission tasked with investigating the circumstances surrounding the covert U.S. raid that killed bin Laden in Pakistan in May 2011. The pan-Arab Al-Jazeera satellite channel published the report on its website after it was leaked to the station by unknown sources.

The U.S. Navy SEALs raid that killed bin Laden in Abbottabad outraged Pakistani officials because they were not told about it beforehand. U.S. officials have said they kept Pakistan in the dark because they were worried the al-Qaida founder would be tipped off.

The fact that the compound where bin Laden was hiding was located only about half a mile from Pakistan's equivalent of West Point led many in the United States to suspect Pakistani officials of aiding the al-Qaida chief, although Washington never found evidence to back that up.

The report said it also found no evidence that current or former Pakistani officials helped bin Laden hide, although it couldn't rule it out completely. It said little is known about the network of support that bin Laden enjoyed in Pakistan.

The report lambasted all levels of government, including the powerful army and intelligence services, for failing to detect the terror leader as he lived in six different places in Pakistan over nine years.

"To summarize, negligence and incompetence to a greater or lesser degree at almost all levels of government are clear," said the report, which was based on testimony from more than 200 witnesses, official documents and site visits.

The criticism of the army and intelligence services was noteworthy in a country where officials often steer clear of taking these organizations to task. But it's unclear if the report will cause any real repercussions. The commission recommended the government make the report public for fear it would be ignored or suppressed, but that never happened, even though it was completed months ago.

The report said it was shocking that nobody in the Pakistani government discovered bin Laden while he was living in Abbottabad for six years in a compound described as "hardly normal," because it was somewhat isolated from homes around it, had high walls and was protected by barbed wire. Bin Laden wore a cowboy hat when he moved around the compound to avoid detection from above.

It said the al-Qaida chief came close to capture in 2002 or 2003 when he was living in the northwest Swat Valley, said the wife of bin Laden's courier, Maryam. A policeman pulled them over for speeding as they were on their way to a bazaar, but Maryam's husband, Ibrahim al-Kuwaiti, quickly settled the matter before the officer recognized bin Laden, she said.

 

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