November 20, 2012

Colombia cool to rebel-announced cease-fire

The government says it will continue military operations even as peace talks get under way.

By Andrea Rodriguez, The Associated Press

HAVANA - Colombia's main rebel group announced a unilateral cease-fire Monday as it began much-anticipated peace talks, but the Bogota government responded that it would continue military operations.

Top negotiator Ivan Marquez said the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia would halt all acts of sabotage and attacks against government and private property starting at midnight Monday and running through Jan. 20.

He made the announcement as negotiators for both sides entered the talks in Havana without other comment.

Marquez said the move was "aimed at strengthening the climate of understanding necessary for the parties to start a dialogue."

Hours later, Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzon told reporters in the Colombian capital that while the government hoped the FARC would keep its promise, "history shows that this terrorist organization has never kept its word. It's very difficult to believe."

He added that Colombian security forces have "the constitutional duty to pursue all criminals who have violated the Constitution."

"As a result, the terrorists of the FARC are being pursued for all the crimes they have committed over so many years and not for future crimes," said Pinzon, one of President Juan Manuel Santos' most trusted collaborators.

The FARC had sought a cease-fire before entering the talks. But Santos firmly rejected halting military operations, intent on obtaining tangible results in the negotiations from an insurgency that has been weakened militarily in recent years.

Piedad Cordoba, a leftist former Colombian senator who has served as a go-between with the Western Hemisphere's last remaining major insurgency, said the unilateral cease-fire gives the FARC "credibility and legitimacy."

"It certainly puts political pressure on the Santos government" not to attack the rebels during the talks, said Adam Isacson, an analyst at the Washington Office on Latin America.

The talks got under way under threatening skies at a convention center in Havana, with most rebel and government negotiators dressed casually in short-sleeve shirts or guayaberas.

 

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