March 17, 2013

Debt crisis 'looming,' not 'immediate,' Boehner says

The House speaker takes issue with the president, saying a balanced budget will help the economy.

Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON - The country does not face an immediate debt crisis, House Speaker John Boehner said Sunday, but he argued that Congress and President Obama must reform entitlements to avert one.

John Boehner
click image to enlarge

House Speaker John Boehner told ABC's "This Week" that he and President Obama have a good relationship and that they're "open with each other ... honest with each other."

2013 file photo/The Associated Press

"We all know that we have one looming. And we have one looming because we have entitlement programs that are not sustainable in their current form. They're going to go bankrupt," Boehner, R-Ohio, told ABC's "This Week."

Boehner agreed with Obama's statement in an interview last week that the debt doesn't present "an immediate crisis."

But Boehner took issue with Obama's assertion that it doesn't make sense to "chase a balanced budget just for the sake of balance."

A budget proposal from House Republicans would balance the budget in 10 years, a priority that is important to the economy, Boehner said.

"Balancing the budget will, in fact, help our economy," Boehner said. "It'll help create jobs in our country, get our economy going again and put more people back to work."

"The fact that the government continues to spend more than a trillion dollars every year that it doesn't have scares investors, scares businesspeople, makes them less willing to hire people," he said.

Boehner also said the House would "review" any gun control measure that came out of the Senate. He restated his opposition to gay marriage, and said that, unlike his fellow Ohio Republican, Sen. Rob Portman, he can't imagine a situation in which he would change his mind.

Boehner said he has a good relationship with Obama and trusts him, and that a lack of good relations is not the problem getting in the way of a sweeping deficit-reduction plan. The challenge is in overcoming big differences, he said.

"When you get down to the bottom line," he said, "if the president believes that we have to have more taxes from the American people, we're not going to get very far."

 

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