March 22, 2013

Funding bill includes six-day mail

But some lawmakers and postal officials say plans to cut Saturday delivery service should proceed.

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON - The new spending bill passed by Congress on Thursday appears to continue the requirement for six-day mail delivery, but some lawmakers and postal officials say plans to cut Saturday service should proceed.

The financially troubled Postal Service announced last month that it would switch in August to five-day service for first-class mail and continue six-day package delivery.

The government at the time was running on a temporary spending measure and postal officials invited lawmakers to spell out the way ahead in the 2013 spending bill. That sweeping funding bill was approved Thursday without new language.

Some lawmakers say a long-standing provision in the bill mandates six-day delivery. Postal authorities argue they still will have delivery over six days, just that not all mail will be delivered all six days.

Meanwhile, the Government Accountability Office weighed in with an opinion that the postal agency did not have the right to unilaterally end Saturday mail.

"We strongly disagree with the GAO's legal opinion," said David Partenheimer, spokesman for the Postal Service. "The critical issue is that the Postal Service is losing $25 million per day under its existing regulatory structure."

The letter carriers union, which has strongly disagreed with the Saturday cutback plan, sided with the GAO.

"We fully expect the Postal Service's board of governors and the postmaster general to follow the law and the expressed will of Congress about maintaining six-day delivery," Fredric Rolando, president of the National Association of Letter Carriers, said in a statement. "We do not expect to have a legal fight."

Some lawmakers believe the agency has the responsibility to make the cutback because of its mounting red ink. Among them are Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma and Rep. Darrell Issa of California. The Republicans sent a letter to the postal board of governors Thursday, telling the governors to stick with their cutback plan.

The Postal Service lost $1.3 billion in the final three months of last year, following a nearly $16 billion loss the previous fiscal year.

 

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)