January 29, 2013

Immigration reform jointly backed

Senators from both parties propose an overhaul that could lead to citizenship for millions here illegally.

By ERICA WERNER The Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Side by side, leading Democratic and Republican senators pledged Monday to propel far-reaching immigration legislation through the Senate by summer, providing a possible path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million people now in the U.S. illegally.

John McCain, Charles Schumer, Marco Rubio
click image to enlarge

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., right, answers a reporter’s question as a bipartisan group of senators propose a sweeping reform of the nation’s immigration laws on Monday. With him at the Capitol in Washington are, from left, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.

The Associated Press

The senators acknowledged pitfalls that have doomed such efforts in the past, but they suggested that November's elections -- with Hispanics voting heavily for President Obama and other Democrats -- could make this time different.

Passage of the emotionally charged legislation by the Democratic-controlled Senate is far from assured, and a taller hurdle could come later in the House, which is dominated by conservative Republicans who've shown little interest in immigration overhaul. Obama will lay out his own proposals Tuesday, most of which mirror the Senate plans.

Besides the citizenship provision, including new qualifications, the Senate measure would increase border security, allow more temporary workers to stay and crack down on employers who would hire illegal immigrants. The plans are still short on detail, and all the senators conceded that months of tedious and politically treacherous negotiations lie ahead.

But with a re-elected Obama pledging his commitment, the lawmakers argued that six years after the last sustained congressional effort at an immigration overhaul came up short in the Senate, chances for approval this year are much better.

Seeking to ramp up pressure on lawmakers, the White House has prepared formal immigration legislation that it could sent to Capitol Hill should the Senate process stall, administration officials said.

Like the president's blueprint, the Senate proposals also call for a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants already here. But lawmakers want the creation of that pathway to be contingent on securing the border and better tracking of people in the U.S. on visas.

The Senate's five-page framework also calls for awarding green cards to immigrants who obtain certain advanced degrees from American universities, creating an effective high-tech employment verification system to ensure that employers do not hire illegal immigrants in the future and allowing more low-skill and agricultural workers.

 

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