July 24, 2013

Agent Orange and Vietnam: Prisoners of poison a war left behind

At least 150,000 children in Vietnam are believed to have severe birth defects caused by Agent Orange.

McClatchy Newspapers

DA NANG, Vietnam — In many ways, Nguyen Thi Ly is just like any other 12-year-old girl. She has a lovely smile and is quick to laugh. She wants to be a teacher when she grows up. She enjoys skipping rope when she plays.

VIETNAMESE GIRL WITH NO ARMS WRITES WITH HER FOOT IN HO CHI MINH CITY.
click image to enlarge

Born without arms, Pham Thi Thuy Linh, 10, writes with her foot at Tu Du hospital in Ho Chi Minh City in a 2004 photo. U.S. aid to help clean up the Agent Orange dioxin contamination and help existing victims has been minimal, but that may be changing.

Reuters

But Ly is also very different from other children. Her head is severely misshapen. Her eyes are unnaturally far apart and permanently askew. She's been hospitalized with numerous ailments since her birth.

Her mother, 43-year-old Le Thi Thu, has similar deformities and health disorders. Neither of them has ever set foot on a battlefield, but they're both casualties.

Le and her daughter are second- and third-generation victims of dioxin exposure, the result of the U.S. military's use of Agent Orange during the Vietnam War, when the U.S. Air Force sprayed more than 20 million gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides over parts of southern Vietnam and along the borders of neighboring Laos and Cambodia. The herbicides were contaminated with dioxin, a deadly compound that remains toxic for decades and causes birth defects, cancer and other illnesses.

To this day, dioxin continues to poison the land and the people. The United States has never accepted responsibility for these victims -- it denies that Agent Orange is responsible for diseases among Vietnamese that are accepted as Agent Orange-caused among American veterans -- and it's unclear when this chain of misery will end.

On Thursday, President Obama will meet with Vietnamese President Truong Tan Sang at the White House, only the third meeting between chief executives of the two countries since Vietnam and the United States established diplomatic relations in 1995.

The two countries share many contemporary concerns. The White House says Obama plans to discuss cooperation on regional issues and trade, plus other U.S. priorities such as climate change and human rights. The two countries share a strong common interest in countering China, which has become increasingly assertive over potentially oil-rich areas of the South China Sea.

Many Vietnamese say it's time for the United States to do more to address the issue of Agent Orange and its victims, so that the last tragic chapter of the Vietnam War finally can be closed.

Le Thi Thu's father served in the North Vietnamese army and was wounded in Quang Tri province, one of the most heavily sprayed areas of the country.

"Before he went to war, my father had two children: my older brother and sister," said Le, who was born in 1970. "They were normal. But after he came back, he had me."

"I could see the differences in myself and others right away," she recalled. "When I was a small child, I felt pain inside my body all the time. My parents took me to the hospital, and the doctors determined that I had been affected by Agent Orange."

When her daughter Ly was born, "we knew right away" Agent Orange was to blame, Le said.

The Vietnam Red Cross estimates that Agent Orange has affected 3 million people spanning three generations, including at least 150,000 children born with severe birth defects since the war ended in 1975.

"During the war, we were hostile, but after the war ended, we normalized our relations and are now building a strategic partnership between Vietnam and the United States," said retired Col. Thai Thanh Hung, the chairman of the 16,500-member Da Nang Veterans Association. "We no longer have hatred towards the Americans and the U.S. government, but we want this one lingering and remaining issue to be addressed, which is that the United States help solve the Agent Orange and dioxin problem. That's why we're keeping an eye on this issue, to see if the United States is really interested in healing the wounds or not."

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