July 2, 2013

Political crisis in Egypt leads to hint of coup by military

BY ABIGAIL HAUSLOHNER The Washington Post

(Continued from page 1)

click image to enlarge

Opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi protest outside the presidential palace, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 1, 2013. Egypt's military on Monday issued a 48-hour ultimatum to the Islamist president and his opponents to reach an agreement to "meet the people's demands" or it will intervene to put forward a political road map for the country and ensure it is carried out. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

click image to enlarge

Protesters pray during a demonstration against Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Monday, July 1, 2013. Egypt's powerful military warned on Monday it will intervene if the Islamist president doesn't "meet the people's demands," giving him and his opponents two days to reach an agreement in what it called a last chance. Hundreds of thousands of protesters massed for a second day calling on Mohammed Morsi to step down. (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo)

Across the city at the Islamists' rival sit-in, Brotherhood politicians and supporters took a steadfast posture in the face of Sissi's perceived threat.

"Any coup against legitimacy will not pass, except through our necks," Mohamed al-Beltagi, a Brotherhood member of Egypt's now-dissolved lower house of parliament, said from a stage outside Cairo's Rabia al-Adawiya mosque.

Monday is not the first time that Egypt's top generals have sought to shepherd the nation through a crisis. Egyptians have long been socialized to admire the military, which has remained Egypt's most popular state institution despite the generals' management of a rocky transition after President Hosni Mubarak's ouster in 2011.

Mubarak's top general, Mohammed Hussein Tantawi, then stepped in, earning the military widespread accolades as national saviors. But opposition to military rule, particularly among the youth activists who spearheaded the uprising, mounted last year as reports of arbitrary arrests, torture and closed military trials surfaced.

On Monday, some prominent Egyptian activists acknowledged that they were wary of a military coup, even though opposition groups had advocated loudly for military intervention. Others argued that there was little choice.

"The problem is that our other option is Morsi staying in power," said Ahmed Maher, the leader of the April 6th youth movement, which helped lead the uprising against Mubarak and later, the protests against military rule.

 

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)