March 4, 2013

Analysis: Tax bills for the rich at highest in decades

But middle- and low-income families aren't paying as much as they used to, a study finds.

By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER The Associated Press

WASHINGTON - The poor rich.

Today's poll: Taxing the rich

Do you think high-income families are taxed fairly?

Yes

No

View Results

U.S. TAX BURDEN, 2013

MIDDLE 20 PERCENT

Average income: $46,562

Average tax bill: $6,436

Average tax rate: 13.8 percent

TOP 20 PERCENT

Average income: $204,490

Average tax bill: $55,533

Average tax rate: 27.2 percent

TOP 1 PERCENT

Average income: $1.4 million

Average tax bill: $514,144

Average tax rate: 35.5 percent

Source: Tax Policy Center

With Washington gridlocked again over whether to raise their taxes, it turns out wealthy families already are paying some of their biggest federal tax bills in decades even as the rest of the population continues to pay at historically low rates.

President Obama and Democratic leaders in Congress say the wealthy must pay their fair share if the federal government is ever going to fix its finances and reduce the budget deficit.

A new analysis, however, shows that average tax bills for high-income families rarely have been higher since the Congressional Budget Office began tracking the data in 1979. Middle- and low-income families aren't paying as much as they used to.

For 2013, families with incomes in the top 20 percent of the nation will pay an average of 27.2 percent of their income in federal taxes, according to projections by the Tax Policy Center, a research organization based in Washington. The top 1 percent of households, those with incomes averaging $1.4 million, will pay an average of 35.5 percent.

Those tax rates, which include income, payroll, corporate and estate taxes, are among the highest since 1979.

The average family in the bottom 20 percent of households won't pay any federal taxes. Instead, many families in this group will get payments from the federal government by claiming more in credits than they owe in taxes, including payroll taxes. That will give them a negative tax rate.

"My sense is that high-income people feel abused by being targeted always for more taxes," Roberton Williams, a fellow at the Tax Policy Center, said. "You can understand why they feel that way."

Senate Democrats have been pushing the "Buffett Rule," named after billionaire investor Warren Buffett. It gradually would phase in a requirement that people making more than $1 million a year pay at least 30 percent in federal taxes.

The rule targets millionaires who make most of their money from investments, which have a top tax rate of 20 percent.

 

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Today's poll: Taxing the rich

Do you think high-income families are taxed fairly?

Yes

No

View Results