March 8, 2013

Tom Connors, Canadian folksinger, dies at age 77

Known as Stompin' Tom, Connors is recognized for 'The Hockey Song,' a favorite at many arenas.

The Associated Press

PETERBOROUGH, Ontario — Canadian country-folk singer Stompin' Tom Connors, whose toe-tapping musical spirit and fierce patriotism established him as one of Canada's biggest cultural icons, has died, his promoter said Wednesday night. He was 77.

Stompin' Tom Connors
click image to enlarge

Stompin' Tom Connors

Connors passed away from natural causes at his home Wednesday evening, Brian Edwards said.

The musician, rarely seen without his signature black cowboy hat and cowboy boots, was best known for songs "Sudbury Saturday Night," "Bud the Spud" and especially "The Hockey Song," a fan favorite played at hockey arenas around North America.

Those three songs are played at every Toronto Maple Leafs home game.

At Toronto's Air Canada Centre Wednesday night, many fans took to their feet as "The Hockey Song" was played after Connors' death was announced.

Although wide commercial appeal eluded Connors for much of his four-decade career, his songs are regarded as veritable national anthems thanks to their unabashed embrace of all things Canadian.

"The hockey song was the biggest one," Edwards said. "Domestically he was known everywhere."

On Twitter, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said "we have lost a true Canadian original. R.I.P. Stompin' Tom Connors. You played the best game that could be played."

The National Hockey League tweeted: "Sad to hear that legendary Canadian Stompin' Tom Connors has passed. His legacy lives on in arenas every time 'The Hockey Song' is played."

Connors knew his health was declining and had posted a message on his website a few days ago, saying Canada kept him "inspired with its beauty, character, and spirit."

Dubbed Stompin' Tom for his habit of pounding the floor with his left foot during performances, Connors garnered a devoted following through straight-ahead country-folk tunes that drew inspiration from his extensive travels around Canada, dating back to his itinerant teenage years when he roamed the country working one job or another.

The country that Connors celebrated in song was strangely ignored by other Canadian songwriters, he often said.

"I don't know why I seem to be the only one, or almost the only one, writing about this country," Connors said in 2008. "The people in this country are starving for songs about their homeland."

He was born in Saint John, New Brunswick, on Feb. 9, 1936, to an unwed teenage mother.

Connors bought his first guitar at age 14 and picked up odd jobs as he wandered from town to town, at times working on fishing boats, as a grave digger, tobacco picker and fry cook.

 

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