April 14, 2013

Letters to the editor: Warming could be good for Maine

On April 3, a group of more than a dozen environmental groups met in Augusta to discuss reinstating the climate change study that Gov. LePage correctly suspended when he took office (“Will Maine revive plan for climate change?” April 4).

You know, there may be some reasons to welcome “climate change” in the state of Maine. There may be some welcome ramifications if winter were a little shorter and warmer.

If our summers were a few weeks longer, we could attract more tourists, one of our greatest resources.

We could grow more potatoes, broccoli, corn and other crops, boosting our economy. 
Our trees, another Maine resource, would grow faster and bigger. We would use far less fuel to heat our houses and businesses.

Throwing more and more money at a phenomenon that has occurred on our planet for billions of years, whether there were humans or not, seems to be more than wasteful – it is a crime.

Since world temperatures have not really gone up in the last two decades, it seems hard to believe we are still talking about oceans rising and the planet burning. It was only a few short decades (1970s) ago that this same group was crying about the coming of another ice age. 

A lot more things are happening in Maine that need real study.

Like how many more mountaintops have to be destroyed chasing the myth of industrial wind.
Like why our state has the most people on welfare per capita in the whole United States.

Like why all the great manufacturing companies that used to be here have left for cheaper energy costs and lower taxes. 

Wake up, Mainers!

James J. Lutz

Bangor

Lawmakers must consider proposals’ statewide impact


As a college student in California, I quickly became aware of the conflict between north and south. Each had a distinct way of life, and outside of California, nobody thinks much about it. In California politics, the differences between north and south create a constant battle over resources.
Upon returning to Maine, I’ve grown increasingly aware of a similar battle.

While growing up in the Bangor area, I had little interaction with folks from the south. I never recognized the cultural split. However, policy has been a great indicator, especially during these tough times of social welfare reform.

A bill to exempt homeowners ages 65 years and over living in poverty from paying property taxes (L.D. 73) was killed this session in committee.

After brief correspondence with a couple of the representatives who co-sponsored this bill, it is unclear how rural Maine communities north of Cumberland County would have been able to offset such a dramatic cut to their primary source of revenue.

The fact that Democratic Rep. Paulette Beaudoin of Biddeford, a co-sponsor of the bill, took a stand for the needs of elders in her community is commendable. I worry, though, that Legislatures do not cooperate enough to find statewide solutions for statewide problems.

Rep. Beaudoin’s heartfelt approach to social welfare was not realistic for the rest of us. Bills like L.D. 73 need to be considered with the whole state in mind.

Maria R. Noyes

Levant

Gov. LePage wise to resist ‘make-work’ borrowing

The Maine Sunday Telegram’s Insight section has Michael Cuzzi’s sloganeering on the governor’s policy changes on state bond sales and health care (“Wanting to be re-elected drives LePage’s reversals,” March 31).

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