May 21, 2013

George Will: Obama scandals shatter Americans' rose-colored glasses

The president who wants constituents to trust him is giving them abundant reasons not to do so.

Leaving aside the seriousness of lawlessness, and the corruption of our civic culture by the professionally pious, this past week has been amusing.

There was the spectacle of advocates of an ever-larger regulatory government expressing shock about such government's large capacity for misbehavior. And, entertainingly, the answer to the question "Will Barack Obama's scandals derail his second-term agenda?" was a question: What agenda?

The scandals are interlocking and overlapping in ways that drain his authority. Everything he advocates requires Americans to lavish on government something his administration, and big government generally, undermines -- trust.

Liberalism's agenda has been constant since long before liberals, having given their name a bad name, stopped calling themselves liberals and resumed calling themselves progressives, which they will call themselves until they finish giving that name a bad name.

The agenda always is: Concentrate more power in Washington, more Washington power in the executive branch and more executive power in agencies run by experts. Then trust the experts to be disinterested and prudent with their myriad intrusions into, and minute regulations of, Americans' lives. Obama's presidency may yet be, on balance, a net plus for the public good if it shatters Americans' trust in the regulatory state's motives.

Now, regarding Obama's second-term agenda. His re-election theme -- re-elect me because I am not Mitt Romney -- yielded a meager mandate, and he used tactics that are now draining the legitimacy an election is supposed to confer.

One tactic was to misrepresent the Benghazi attack lest it undermine his narrative about taming terrorism. Does anyone think the administration's purpose in manufacturing 12 iterations of the talking points was to make them more accurate?

Another tactic was using the "federal machinery to screw our political enemies." The words are from a 1971 memo by the then-White House counsel, John Dean, whose spirit still resides where he worked prior to prison. Congress may contain some Democrats who owed their 2012 election to the Internal Revenue Service's suppression of conservative political advocacy.

Obama's supposed "trifecta" of scandals -- Benghazi, the IRS and the seizure of Associated Press phone records -- neglects some.

A fourth scandal is power being wielded by executive branch officials (at the National Labor Relations Board and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau) illegally installed in office by presidential recess appointments made when the Senate was not in recess.

A fifth might be Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius soliciting, from corporations in industries HHS regulates, funds to replace some that Congress refused to appropriate.

The money is to be spent by nonprofit -- which does not mean nonpolitical -- entities. The funds are to educate Americans about, which might mean (consider the administration's Benghazi and IRS behaviors) propagandize in favor of, Obamacare and to enroll people in its provisions.

The experienced (former governor, former secretary of education, 10 years in the Senate) and temperate Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., compares this to the Iran-Contra scandal, wherein the Reagan administration raised private funds to do what Congress had refused to do -- finance the insurgency against Nicaragua's government.

Obama's incredibly shrinking presidency is a reminder that politics is a transactional business, trust is the currency of the transactions, and the currency has been debased. For example:

Obama says: Trust me, I do not advocate universal preschool simply to swell the ranks of unionized, dues-paying, Democratic-funding teachers. Trust me, I know something not known by the social scientists who say the benefits of such preschool are small and evanescent.

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