Politics

December 31, 2013

Tax breaks for research, the energy conscious and the charitable to expire

Congress, in a nearly annual dance, allows 55 popular tax breaks expire at midnight.

By Stephen Ohlemacher
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON – In an almost annual ritual, Congress is letting a package of 55 popular tax breaks expire at the end of the year, creating uncertainty – once again – for millions of individuals and businesses.

click image to enlarge

Many have criticized the way Congress handles tax breaks. "It’s not fair, it’s very hard, it’s very difficult for a business person, a company, to plan, not just for the short term but to do long-term planning,” says Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., a member of House Ways and Means Committee member. “It’s shameful."

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Tax breaks expiring at end of year

Fifty-five temporary tax breaks are expiring at the end of the year. Among the big ones:

A tax credit for research and development, benefiting a wide range of industries, including manufacturers, pharmaceutical makers and high tech companies. The tax break saved companies an estimated $6.2 billion in 2013.

An exemption that allows banks, insurance companies and other financial firms to shield foreign profits from being taxed by the U.S. The tax break is important to major multinational banks and financial firms, saving them an estimated $9.4 billion in 2013.

A tax break that allows profitable companies to write off large capital expenditures immediately – rather than over time – giving some companies huge tax shelters. The tax break, known as bonus depreciation, benefits automakers, utilities and heavy equipment makers. Tax break: $34 billion in 2013, though companies lose future savings because they would have already written off the cost of items.

A tax credit for producing renewable energy, including wind and solar, in plants built before the end of 2013. Tax break: $116 million in 2013, though the savings would grow over time, saving companies more than $12 billion over the next decade as the plants continue to produce energy.

A provision that allows restaurants and retail stores to more quickly write off the cost of improvements. Tax break: $277 million in 2013.

Increased tax rebates to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands from a tax on rum imported into the United States. The U.S. imposes a $13.50 per proof-gallon tax on imported rum, and sends most of the proceeds to the two U.S. territories. Cost: $199 million in 2013.

A 50 percent tax credit for expenses related to railroad track maintenance through 2013. Tax break: $232 million in 2013.

A provision that allows motorsport race tracks to more quickly write off improvement costs. Tax break: $46 million in 2013.

Enhanced deductions for companies that donate food to the needy, books to public schools or computers to public libraries. Tax break: $218 million in 2013.

A tax break that allows TV and movie productions to more quickly write off expenses. Sexually explicit productions are ineligible. Tax break: $266 million in 2013.

A tax credit of up to $2,500 for buying electric-powered vehicles was expanded to include electric-powered motorcycles. Golf carts, however, were excluded. Tax break: $1 million in 2013.

Source: Joint Committee on Taxation

Lawmakers let these tax breaks lapse almost every year, even though they save businesses and individuals billions of dollars. And almost every year, Congress eventually renews them, retroactively, so taxpayers can claim them by the time they file their tax returns.

No harm, no foul, right? After all, taxpayers filing returns in the spring won’t be hurt because the tax breaks were in effect for 2013. Taxpayers won’t be hit until 2015, when they file tax returns for next year.

Not so far. Trade groups and tax experts complain that Congress is making it impossible for businesses and individuals to plan for the future. What if lawmakers don’t renew the tax break you depend on? Or what if they change it and you’re no longer eligible?

“It’s a totally ridiculous way to run our tax system,” said Rachelle Bernstein, vice president and tax counsel for the National Retail Federation. “It’s impossible to plan when every year this happens, but yet business has gotten used to that.”

Some of the tax breaks are big, including billions in credits for companies that invest in research and development, generous exemptions for financial institutions doing business overseas, and several breaks that let businesses write off capital investments faster.

Others are more obscure, the benefits targeted to film producers, race track owners, makers of electric motorcycles and teachers who buy classroom supplies with their own money.

There are tax rebates to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands from a tax on rum imported into the United States, and a credit for expenses related to railroad track maintenance.

A deduction for state and local sales taxes benefits people who live in the nine states without state income taxes. Smaller tax breaks benefit college students and commuters who use public transportation.

A series of tax breaks promote renewable energy, including a credit for power companies that produce electricity with windmills.

The annual practice of letting these tax breaks expire is a symptom a divided, dysfunctional Congress that struggles to pass routine legislation, said Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a senior Democrat on the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee.

“It’s not fair, it’s very hard, it’s very difficult for a business person, a company, to plan, not just for the short term but to do long-term planning,” Lewis said. “It’s shameful.”

With Congress on vacation until January, there is no chance the tax breaks will be renewed before they expire. And there is plenty of precedent for Congress to let them expire for months without addressing them. Most recently, they expired at the end of 2011, and Congress didn’t renew them for the entire year, waiting until New Year’s Day 2013 – just in time for taxpayers to claim them on their 2012 returns.

But Congress only renewed the package though the end of 2013.

Why such a short extension? Washington accounting is partly to blame. The two-year extension Congress passed in January cost $76 billion in reduced revenue for the government, according to the nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation. Making those tax breaks permanent could add $400 billion or more to the deficit over the next decade.

With budget deficits already high, many in Congress are reluctant to vote for a bill that would add so much red ink. So, they do it slowly, one or two years at time.

“More cynically, some people say, if you just put it in for a year or two, then that keeps the lobbyists having to come back and wine-and-dine the congressmen to get it extended again, and maybe make some campaign contributions,” said Mark Luscombe, principal tax analyst for CCH, a consulting firm based in Riverwoods, Ill.

(Continued on page 2)

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