Politics

March 23, 2013

Spending plan squeaks through Senate

The $3.7 trillion budget, approved after 20 hours of votes and debate, calls for $1 trillion in tax hikes.

By ALAN FRAM/The Associated Press

An exhausted Senate gave pre-dawn approval Saturday to a Democratic $3.7 trillion budget for next year that embraces nearly $1 trillion in tax increases over the coming decade but shelters domestic programs targeted for cuts by House Republicans.

Patty Murray
click image to enlarge

Senate Budget Chair Patty Murray, D-Wash., says the Senate and House budgets represent “different visions for how our country should work and who it should work for.” The House plan imposes no tax hikes and balances the budget within 10 years by cutting safety net programs.

2013 File Photo/The Associated Press

While their victory was by a razor-thin 50-49 vote, it allowed Democrats to tout their priorities. Yet it doesn't resolve the deep differences the two parties have over deficits and the size of government.

Joining all Republicans voting no were four Democrats who face re-election next year in potentially difficult races: Sens. Max Baucus of Montana, Mark Begich of Alaska, Kay Hagan of North Carolina and Mark Pryor of Arkansas.

Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., did not vote.

White House spokesman Jay Carney praised the Senate plan, saying in a statement that it "will create jobs and cut the deficit in a balanced way."

While calling on both sides to find common ground, Carney did not hold out much hope for compromise with Republicans. The rival budget passed by the Republican-led House cuts social programs too deeply, he said, and fails "to ask for a single dime of deficit reduction from closing tax loopholes for the wealthy and well-connected."

The Senate vote came after lawmakers labored through the night on scores of symbolic amendments, ranging from voicing support for letting states collect taxes on Internet sales to expressing opposition to requiring photo IDs for voters.

Final approval came around 5 a.m., capping an extraordinary 20 hours of votes and debate. As the night wore on, virtually all senators remained in the chamber, a rarity during a normal business day. But at that hour, most had nowhere else to go.

The Senate's budget would shrink annual federal shortfalls over the next decade to nearly $400 billion, raise unspecified taxes by $975 billion and cull modest savings from domestic programs.

In contrast, a rival budget approved by the Republican-run House balances the budget within 10 years without boosting taxes.

That blueprint -- by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., his party's vice-presidential candidate last year -- claims $4 trillion more in savings over the period than Senate Democrats by digging deeply into Medicaid, food stamps and other safety net programs for the needy. It would also transform the Medicare health care program for seniors into a voucher-like system for future recipients.

"We have presented very different visions for how our country should work and who it should work for," said Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty Murray, D-Wash.

The long debate became testy at times.

As the clock ticked past 1 a.m., Murray asked senators to show respect for colleagues "who may not be able to stand as long as us, or who are elderly." Sen. David Vitter, R-La., shot back that Republicans were not trying to delay anything, and wondered what flights or other appointments would be missed if senators voted until 7 a.m.

The loudest acclaim came toward the end, when senators rose as one to cheer a handful of Senate pages -- high school students -- for their work in the chamber since the morning's opening gavel. Senators then left town for a two-week spring recess.

Congressional budgets are planning documents that leave actual changes in revenues and spending for later legislation, and this was the first the Democratic-run Senate has approved in four years. That lapse is testament to the political and mathematical contortions needed to write fiscal plans in an era of record-breaking deficits, and to the parties' profoundly conflicting views.

Republicans said the Democratic budget wasn't much of an accomplishment. "The only good news is that the fiscal path the Democrats laid out ... won't become law," said Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

(Continued on page 2)

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