November 27, 2012

Marvin Miller, union head who revolutionized sports, dies at 95

The former leader of the Major League Players Association won free agency for players in 1975, forever changing sports.

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Marvin Miller was a labor economist who never played a day of organized baseball. He preferred tennis. Yet he transformed the national pastime as surely as Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson, television and night games.

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Marvin Miller speaks to reporters after rejecting a proposal to end a baseball strike in this July 16, 1981, photo.

AP

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This 1972 photo shows Marvin Miller, left, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association, and Joe Torre, of the St. Louis Cardinals, talking to reporters after Miller announced an end to a baseball strike.

AP

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Miller, the union boss who won free agency for baseball players in 1975, ushering in an era of multimillion-dollar contracts and athletes who switch teams at the drop of a batting helmet, died Tuesday at 95. He had been diagnosed with liver cancer in August.

"I think he's the most important baseball figure of the last 50 years," former baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent said. "He changed not just the sport but the business of the sport permanently, and he truly emancipated the baseball player — and in the process all professional athletes. Prior to his time, they had few rights. At the moment, they control the games."

In his 16 1/2 years as executive director of the Major League Players Association, starting in 1966, Miller fought owners on many fronts, not only achieving free agency but making the word "strike" stand for something other than a pitched ball.

Over the years, his influence was widely acknowledged if not always honored. Baseball fans argue over whether he made the game fairer or more nakedly mercenary, and the Hall of Fame repeatedly rejected him in what was attributed to lingering resentment among team owners.

Players attending the union's annual executive board meeting in New York said their professional lives are Miller's legacy.

"Anyone who's ever played modern professional sports owes a debt of gratitude to Marvin Miller," Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Chris Capuano said. "He empowered us as players. He gave us ownership of the game we play. Anyone who steps on a field in any sport, they have a voice because of him."

Major League Baseball's revenue has grown from $50 million in 1967 to $7.5 billion this year. At his last public speaking engagement, a discussion at New York University School of Law in April marking the 40th anniversary of the first baseball strike, Miller said free agency and resulting fan interest contributed to the increase. And both management and labor benefited, he said.

"I never before saw such a win-win situation in my life, where everybody involved in Major League Baseball, both sides of the equation, still continue to set records in terms of revenue and profits and salaries and benefits," Miller said. He called it "an amazing story."

Miller, who retired in 1982, led the first walkout in the game's history 10 years earlier, a fight over pension benefits. On April 5, 1972, signs posted at major league parks simply said: "No Game Today." The strike, which lasted 13 days, was followed by a walkout during spring training in 1976 and a midseason job action that darkened the stadiums for seven weeks in 1981.

Miller led players through three strikes and two lockouts. Baseball has had eight work stoppages in all.

Slightly built and silver-haired with a thick, dark mustache, Miller operated with an eloquence and a soft-spoken manner that belied his toughness. He clashed repeatedly with Commissioner Bowie Kuhn.

Before Miller took over the union, some players actually opposed his appointment as successor to Milwaukee Judge Robert Cannon, who had counseled them on a part-time but unpaid basis.

"Some of the player representatives were leery about picking a union man," Hall of Fame pitcher and former U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning said in 1974. "But he was very articulate ... not the cigar-chewing type some of the guys expected."

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A 2003 photo of Marvin Miller at his apartment in New York.

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