November 6, 2013

NFL player leaves fame, fortune, money - for sake of his health

Broncos guard John Moffitt, who is 27, leaves more than $1 million on the table.

By Arnie Stapleton
The Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. – John Moffitt wasn’t unhappy with a lack of playing time in Denver. He quit the NFL because he’d lost his love for the game and was tired of risking his health.

click image to enlarge

2013 Associated Press File Photo Denver Broncos guard John Moffitt says he quit the NFL this week not because he was unhappy with a lack of playing time in Denver but because he’d lost his love for the game and was tired of risking his health.

The third-year guard from Wisconsin called the Broncos from his home in Seattle this week to notify them he wouldn’t be returning to the team following its bye.

Then he announced on Twitter that he was calling it a career, saying, “Football was fun but my head hurts-haha kidding roger goodell. I’m on to new things, thanks to everyone along the way!!!”

The Broncos put him on their reserve/left team list on Tuesday when they activated center J.D. Walton from the physically unable to perform list.

They have five days to formally release Moffitt, who left more than $1 million on the table, including about $312,500 for the remainder of this season and $752,500 in non-guaranteed salary in 2014.

Moffitt, who signed a four-year contract for nearly $3 million after Seattle made him the 75th overall draft pick in 2011, said he knows teammates and fans don’t understand how he could forgo the fame and fortune of pro football.

“I just really thought about it and decided I’m not happy. I’m not happy at all,” Moffitt told The Associated Press in a phone interview from Seattle. “And I think it’s really madness to risk your body, risk your well-being and risk your happiness for money.

“Everybody, they just don’t get it and they think it’s crazy. But I think what I was doing is crazy.”

He said he didn’t want to see things through this season for the shot at a Super Bowl.

“I don’t care about the Super Bowl. I don’t,” Moffitt insisted. “I used to. I mean, anytime I played this game, I gave my heart to it and I’m a person that does thing with his heart. ... I don’t need the Super Bowl experience. I played in great stadiums and I played against great players. And I had that experience and it’s enough.”

The Broncos acquired Moffitt on Aug. 20 from the Seahawks after he’d lost out on one of two starting guard spots in Seattle during training camp. He played in two games for the Broncos (7-1).

Moffitt, 27, made about $1.8 million before taxes in his 2 1/2 seasons in the NFL.

“I’ve saved enough. It’s not like I’m sitting here and I’m a millionaire,” he said. “That’s what I kind of realized. I’m sitting here and I got to this point and I was, like, what is the number that you need? How much do you really need? What do you want in life? And I decided that I don’t really need to be a millionaire.

“I just want to be happy. And I find that people that have the least in life are sometimes the happiest. And I don’t have the least in life. I have enough in life. And I won’t sacrifice my health for that.”

Moffitt stressed that he’s not passing judgment on his former colleagues, saying, “This is all my personal stuff and I respect this game and I respect the men in this game.”

Although Moffitt never had a history of concussions, he acknowledged all the blows he sustained in practices and games concerned him.

“I’m not trying to be the poster boy for ‘Oh, I thought I should leave because of concussions.’ I’m just saying, it’s a valid point,” Moffitt said. “I love the game and I respect the game and everybody who plays it knows what they risk and I knew what I risked when I played, and I’m no longer willing to risk it.”

(Continued on page 2)

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