June 24, 2013

Nadal stunned at Wimbledon in 1st round by Darcis

By Stephen Wilson / The Associated Press

(Continued from page 2)

click image to enlarge

Steve Darcis of Belgium reacts as he defeats Rafael Nadal of Spain in their men's first round singles at Wimbledon Monday.

AP

click image to enlarge

Rafael Nadal of Spain reacts as he loses a point to Steve Darcis of Belgium during their men's first round singles match at Wimbledon Monday.

AP

Then, after saving Darcis' first four set points in the ensuing tiebreaker, Nadal held one set point himself. With a chance to even the match, however, he dumped a backhand into the net. Two points later, Nadal sailed an errant forehand long, and Darcis held his right fist aloft, celebrating a two-set lead.

Darcis then broke to open the third, and the spectators roared, not so much because they dislike Nadal, but perhaps so they could forever boast, "I was there."

Despite feeling tired as the match approached three hours, Darcis played brilliantly in the final game. He hit a forehand winner. He delivered another winner on the run and, as his momentum carried him near the stands, Darcis dropped to a knee and pumped his right arm. After one last Nadal miscue set up match point, Darcis capped his victory with a 109 mph ace.

"I'm not going to get wasted just because I beat Nadal. ... I might have a beer; the 'recovery beer' we call it," Darcis said. "I need to keep my focus. It would be a shame to beat Nadal, then stop there."

In 2012, Rosol did stop there, losing his next match at Wimbledon. And in a bit of symmetry, Rosol's 2013 first-round match — a five-set loss — was wrapping up on tiny Court 19 just as Nadal and Darcis were starting on adjacent Court 1.

While he was sidelined from June to February, Nadal missed the London Olympics, U.S. Open and Australian Open. Pressed about his upcoming schedule, and the notion that his grinding, hustling style might put too much pounding on his body, Nadal at first said Monday that no one can ever be sure about the future.

But he did say: "I don't have any intention of missing the U.S. Open," the year's last Grand Slam tournament, which begins in late August.

A reporter wanted to know what Nadal's goals are at this point.

"My only dream now is to go home and think ... (and) analyze my situation," he said.

Between words, Nadal took a sip of water, then plopped his player badge on the table in front of him. For the first time in his Grand Slam career, he won't be needing it after Day 1.

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)


 

Blogs

Clearing the Bases - Yesterday
Pitching, pitching, pitching

More PPH Blogs

Winter sports 2013-2014

High School Football 2013

Fall sports photos