February 14

U.S. Olympic speedskaters want more zip in their suits

The team is ditching new high-tech suits after a disappointing start at the Winter Games in Sochi.

By Paul Newberry
The Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia — They were touted as the fastest speedskating suits in the world.

click image to enlarge

Shani Davis is a top-ranked speedskater but has finished no higher than eighth in the Winter Olympics.

The Associated Press

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Tucker Fredricks of the United States competes in the first heat of the men’s 500-meter speedskating race at Adler Arena in Sochi, Russia, on Feb. 10.

The Associated Press

Now the United States is dumping the high-tech attire after a dismal start to the Sochi Olympics.

Kevin Haley, vice president of innovation for suit developer Under Armour, said Friday the Americans had received permission to go back to the suits they used while posting impressive results on the fall World Cup circuit and at the U.S. Olympic trials in December.

The change begins Saturday with the men’s 1,500 meters, when Shani Davis hopes to make up for a disappointing performance in his first race at Sochi.

Under Armour was busy altering the logo on the old suits, so it conforms with International Olympic Committee regulations.

“We want to put the athletes in the best possible position when they’re stepping on the ice to be 100 percent confident in their ability to capture a spot on the podium,” Haley said by phone from Baltimore.

The change was a stunning reversal after the Americans arrived in Sochi proclaiming they had a suit that would give them a technological edge over rival countries such as the Netherlands.

Instead, the Dutch have dominated through the first six races, winning 12 of a possible 18 medals, including four golds. The Americans have yet to finish higher than seventh; Davis and female stars Heather Richardson and Brittany Bowe have all been major disappointments.

While Haley expressed confidence in the new suit, saying all the data proved it should produce faster times, he said the company agreed to the change because a few athletes felt it was actually a drag on their times.

“If they have one less thing to be distracted by,” Haley said, “that should give them a little bit of an advantage.”

The new skinsuits, developed with help from aerospace and defense giant Lockheed Martin and unveiled just before the Sochi Olympics, had definitely become a major distraction.

Even though several coaches and athletes defended the technology, it was clear that U.S. Speedskating needed to change things up to make sure this didn’t become a total bust of a Winter Games.

“Morale is down right now,” said Joey Mantia, another of the U.S. skaters in the 1,500.

The new suit, known as “Mach 39,” has become a convenient explanation for the American woes, because they were unveiled so late in the game, without giving the skaters a chance to wear them in competition.

Even before the Olympics began, the designer of the Dutch suits expressed skepticism about the American claims. Bert van der Tuuk said he even tested some of the elements used in the U.S. suit – rivets, seams, bumps and a diagonal zipper to cut down on drag – and found they provided no significant edge.

Others backed the new suits. Haley said the majority of the team wanted to stick with it, but the change was made to make sure everyone was comfortable. ISU rules require the entire team to wear the same suit.

“There’s absolutely no doubt in my mind that this is the most scientific suit in the whole world,” said U.S. skater Patrick Meek. “These guys make F-16 fighter jets. If they can invade Afghanistan and Iraq, they can build a speedskating suit.”

The Dutch athletes began testing their own new suits during the World Cup season and were allowed to use them at the country’s highly competitive Olympic trials.

(Continued on page 2)

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