December 18, 2013

World Cup organizers say safety trumps soccer stadium construction speed

With stadiums still being built and the games approaching, another death has to be explained.

By John Leicester
The Associated Press

SAO PAULO — Days after the latest death by a World Cup worker, organizers insisted Tuesday they aren’t sacrificing safety in a rush to complete stadiums for next year’s event.

A laborer fell 115 feet Saturday in the jungle city of Manaus at the Arena Amazonia, one of Brazil’s stadiums that is behind schedule. That was the second death there in less than a year, and the fifth at a World Cup venue in the past two years.

Ron DelMont, the managing director of FIFA’s World Cup Brazil office, and Deputy Sports Minister Luis Fernandes said safety isn’t being compromised for speed.

“There’s never a discussion that says you have to cut any corners to make sure you deliver the stadium,” DelMont said.

DelMont said FIFA has “at no point” suggested loosening its safety requirements and “everything that we ask for is within the legislation and the guidelines of the government.”

“It’s a bit frustrating to make that kind of suggestion that the event is much more important than the safety of the workers because it’s not only the safety of the workers, it’s the safety of the spectators,” he said. “So we don’t compromise at all.”

Fernandes, speaking in the same interview with a small group of reporters, said he’s “pretty sure” accident rates on World Cup venues are “well under” those in other sectors of Brazilian construction.

“It’s a tragedy for all of us but I would not credit that to any undue pressure,” Fernandes said, referring to the death in Manaus. “There are accidents that are involved when you have so many thousands of workers.”

He noted that the construction companies at nearly all stadiums are “very experienced” and global. He promised “full punishment under the rule of law” for any firm that violates Brazil’s “very strict, rigid, firm, labor protection laws.”

Two workers were killed when a crane collapsed Nov. 27 as it was hoisting a 500-ton piece of roofing at the stadium in Sao Paulo that will host the World Cup opener. Last year a worker died at the construction site of the stadium in Brasilia. The other death in Manaus happened in March.

The most delayed stadium is expected to be the one in Sao Paulo, where construction is to finish April 15, followed by test matches.

Among other venues, the west-central city of Cuiaba also stands out because so much supporting infrastructure is still being worked on. For now, travelers there land at an airport bustling with construction, take a road half ripped up for promised tramlines and arrive at a stadium where the roof and facades aren’t finished. The muddy field was only recently seeded.

“Cuiaba is a construction site,” Fernandes said. “But I think from the government perspective that’s a very good situation because it won’t be a construction site for the World Cup.”

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)


 

Blogs

More PPH Blogs

Winter sports 2013-2014

High School Football 2013

Fall sports photos