August 15, 2013

From around the world, together in Little League

The World Series in Williamsport, Pa., is about to start, with all parts of the globe represented.

The Associated Press

WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - Sixteen teams gathered for the Little League World Series, some from thousands of miles away, but all feeling right at home.

"It's beyond exciting to be here, said Sammamish, Wash., assistant coach Matt Fitzgibbons. "We've kind of talked about it among the coaches and we were calling it the Augusta National of baseball. Everything is first class. The people are first class. The facilities are first class. It's exceeded our wildest expectations."

Newark, Del., pitcher Nate Hardcastle, 12, called it "probably the most exciting thing to happen to me so far in my life."

The 67th World Series begins at 1 p.m. Thursday when Panama will face Puerto Rico.

Other games are Corpus Christi, Texas, vs. Sammamish, Wash., Australia vs. Mexico and South Nashville, Tenn., vs. Westport, Conn. The final is Aug. 25.

While that worldwide exposure might be enough to make the average 12-year-old nervous, Coach Tim Rogers of Westport, Conn., believes his team that has won 17 straight games can handle it.

"They've played a lot of baseball the last four years in travel tournaments," Rogers said. "They've been on big stages before so they don't let the moment get to them, or they haven't, at least."

A team from the Czech Republic is making its first appearance in Williamsport and Coach Pavel Chadim praised Little League Baseball officials for their commitment to the European Baseball Association.

"The last six years the level of baseball in Czech Republic, Germany, Italy has grown up unbelievably," Chadim said.

"We have the best fields for young players. It's not easy to teach them the right way to play baseball if you don't have a good field. We thank those who are behind the idea that anybody anywhere in the world can be a star and our players can be a star and feel like a star. It's a great, amazing feeling."

Chadim also has the only girl on any of the 16 team rosters in Elishka Stejskalova. "It's not easy for her to fit in but she's unbelievable," Chadim said.

"It feels like normal," Stejskalova said. "I have two brothers, one older and one is twin. I beat him for the position."

When the Czech Republic faces perennial power Japan on Friday, his pitchers will throw fastballs and change-ups, he said. Curveballs cannot be thrown in the Czech Republic leagues until players are age 14.

"We don't have enough pitchers like U.S. or Japan," Chadimsaid. "We work fastballs and off-speed."

 

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