July 31, 2013

Rodriguez's fate prompts questions

By RONALD BLUM The Associated Press

(Continued from page 1)

Cincinnati Manager Pete Rose agreed to a lifetime ban in 1989 following an investigation of his gambling. Yankees owner George Steinbrenner agreed to a lifetime ban effective in August 1990 for his dealings with self-described gambler Howard Spira and was reinstated in March 1993.

 

Q: How did this happen to Rodriguez?

A: MLB has been investigating the three-time AL MVP over various periods since February 2009, when he acknowledged using performance-enhancing drugs while with Texas from 2001-03. Rodriguez has denied using them since. He met with baseball investigators in March 2009, then met with them again in March 2010 and told them he didn't receive PEDs from Dr. Anthony Galea, who treated Rodriguez without the Yankees' consent following hip surgery in 2009.

Galea pleaded guilty in 2011 to a federal charge of bringing unapproved drugs into the United States from Canada. As part of the Biogenesis probe, Rodriguez met again with baseball investigators on July 12 this year.

 

Q: How much will this cost him?

A: Hard to put an exact figure on it until the length of the suspension is determined.

Rodriguez is baseball's highest-paid player this year at $28 million. If he's suspended Wednesday for the rest of the season, he would lose $8,508,366 under the formula in baseball's Joint Drug Agreement: 56 games (the total remaining for the Yankees) divided by 183 (the number of days this season) times his salary.

He is owed an additional $86 million by the Yankees over the next four years: $25 million in 2014, $21 million in 2015 and $20 million in each of the final two seasons. Not at risk is a $3 million payment from the Yankees on Jan. 15, the final installment of his signing bonus, and $36 million-plus interest owed by Texas from 2016-25, funds that were deferred in his contract with the Rangers and converted to an assignment bonus at the time of his trade to the Yankees in 2004.

 

Q: What would be the impact of a suspension be on the New York Yankees?

A: In addition to not having to pay Rodriguez, the Yankees would have a much easier time to get under next year's $189 million threshold for baseball's luxury tax, which has room for about $177 million in salaries before benefits are added.

Rodriguez's contract has a $27.5 million impact on the Yankees' payroll for luxury tax purposes. Others whose salaries are coming off the payroll next year include Curtis Granderson ($15 million), Andy Pettitte ($12 million), Mariano Rivera ($10 million), Phil Hughes ($7.15 million). And if he exercises his $9.5 million player option, Derek Jeter's luxury tax salary would drop from his 2013 value of about $15.5 million.

If he remains with the Yankees, Robinson Cano's salary is likely to increase from its current $15 million.

 

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