The sister-communities of Gray and New Gloucester offer fun activities for the whole family. Tied together by a shared school district, the communities boast excellent camping and golf opportunities as well as one of the last Shaker villages in America.

10 things to do:

1. Hiking trails at Poland Spring Resort – Enjoy a leisurely walk in the woods at Poland Spring Resort. A trail system starts in the parking lot across from The Source, down the hill from All Souls Chapel. Choose from a short loop of about a half-mile or a long loop of several miles. For more information about Poland Spring Resort, check out www.polandspringinns.com.

2. Harmony Hall – If you love country music, one of the best honky-tonks in Maine is just across the Gray border on Route 115 in North Yarmouth: Harmony Hall. Old friends and newcomers welcome. Go to www.harmonyhallclub.com for more information.

3. Cyr Auction – Located on Route 110 just north of Cole Farms Restaurant in Gray, Cyr Auction is host to a wide variety of auctions. Catch one of their estate auctions and you may just find that treasure you’ve been dreaming of. For more information, go to www.cyrauction.com.

4. Twin Brooks Camping Area – Located on the beautiful shores of Little Sebago Lake in Gray Twin Brooks is family friendly, offers tent sites or RV hook-ups and a boat ramp for the outdoor lover. A sandy beach awaits as does fun in the summer sun for all who visit. For more information, log onto www.campmaine.com/twinbrooks.

5. Crystal Lake – Fishing in Maine for avid anglers “from away” is a lifetime goal. For others who are lucky to live locally it’s an annual tradition. Crystal Lake, located in Gray on Route 26, is a beautiful spot to practice for cast and reel in a trophy. A public boat launch is available. Wilkie’s Beach on Crystal Lake offers a boat ramp. From downtown Gray, take Route 26 for 3 miles to Dry Mills. Turn left onto North Raymond Road and go a quarter of a mile.

6. Foley’s Bakery at Pineland – After a walk on the beautiful and expansive trail system at Pineland Farms in New Gloucester, don’t forget to enjoy a muffin, coffee or pastry at Foley’s Bakery, located in the visitor’s center on campus. On your way out, don’t miss the campus model display. Push a button and a section of the sprawling Pineland campus will light up and show you where you are in relation to other buildings on campus. For more information, check out www.pinelandfarms.org.

7. Native American powwow: On the weekend of Aug. 11-12, be sure to visit the Maine Wildlife Park on Route 26 in Gray for the annual Native American Powwow – Honor the Animals! Representatives of several tribes will be at the park for two full days with dancers, drummers, craft vendors, singers and traditional food booths. Special events will be presented throughout each day. This is an exciting opportunity to learn more about Maine’s Native Americans. For more information, go to www.maine.gov/ifw/education/wildlifepark.

8. Ice Cream Dugout – Have you ever eaten an ice cream treat that was named for one of your favorite Boston Red Sox players? Go to the Ice Cream Dugout on Route 26 in Gray and you can do just that. Choose from a bunt, single, double, or triple scoop cones, and cool off with some fine Shain’s of Maine ice cream on a hot summer afternoon. For more information, go to www.icecreamdugout.com.

9. Dry Mills Fish Hatchery – Ever wonder where the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife come up with all those fish they stock each year? Go to the Dry Mills Fish Hatchery in Gray and find out. Access to the hatchery is through the Maine Wildlife Park’s main entrance. Let the kids feed the fish as well. Fish food available on site for a fee. For more information, call 657-4962.

10. Historic mill – Check out the ruins of America’s first woolen mill, located on Mayall Road near the intersection of Route 100 in Gray. Along Collyer Brook, Samuel Mayall established in 1791 the first successful water-powered woolen mill in North America. Paths lead to the foundations of former mill buildings and poster displays tell the story of the mill in drawings and short histories.


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