LONDON – It was just an old Chinese vase that had been in the family for 80 years — but turned out to be much, much more.

When the intricately painted 18th-century piece went on the block at Bainbridges, a small suburban London auction house, it sold for a record $83 million Thursday, scooped up by a Chinese buyer.

“How do you anticipate the Chinese market?” asked the shocked auctioneer, Peter Bainbridge. “It’s totally on fire.”

The sale price was more than 40 times the pre-sale estimate and a record for a Chinese work of art — an outcome Bainbridge called “a fairy tale” for the family who owned the vase.

The sellers, who wished to remain anonymous, said the vase had been in the family at least since the 1930s, though they don’t know how it was acquired.

Many Chinese artifacts surfaced in Britain in the 19th century, having been looted from Beijing’s Summer Palace when it was sacked by British and French troops at the end of the Second Opium War in 1860.

Painted sky blue and imperial yellow and adorned with medallions depicting leaping goldfish, the 16-inch vase dates from the Qing dynasty, a time when Chinese porcelain-making was at its pinnacle. Made for the personal collection of Emperor Qianlong and bearing the imperial seal, experts said it was an exceptional piece.

But no one expected what happened when the piece went on the block. Bainbridge said the atmosphere was “electric,” and when the hammer came down on the winning bid he struck it so hard the gavel broke.

“There was a silence that wrapped itself around the sale as the figure grew slowly but surely up to the sky,” said Bainbridge, who specializes in house clearance sales — and whose previous record sold for $161,000.

“I’m an auctioneer, so at that point I’m just doing the professional job I’m paid to do. But once the hammer’s down you do take stock slightly and think, ‘Oh, wow, that’s really rather a lot of money,’” said Bainbridge, whose $13.9 million buyer’s premium is included in the sale price.

The vase, bought by a Chinese bidder on behalf of an undisclosed buyer, beat the previous record for Chinese art. A 45-foot-long 11th-century scroll elaborately decorated with calligraphy sold for almost $64 million in Beijing in June.

While the vase sold Thursday is not extremely old — it dates from around 1740 — it comes from a period whose works are coveted by Chinese buyers. Last month, Sotheby’s sold another Qing dynasty vase in Hong Kong for $32 million.

“While European taste tends to focus on the really old stuff produced by the Chinese, Chinese collectors consider this period of porcelains the zenith of their art,” said Roland Arkell, deputy editor of the Antiques Trade Gazette.