BOSTON – States with the least religious residents are also the stingiest about giving money to charity, a new study on the generosity of Americans suggests.

The study, released Monday by the Chronicle of Philanthropy, found that residents in states where religious participation is higher than the rest of the nation, particularly in the South, gave the greatest percentage of their discretionary income to charity.

The Northeast, with lower religious participation, was the least generous to charities, with the six New England states filling the last six slots among the 50 states. Churches are among the organizations counted as charities by the study, and some states in the Northeast rank in the top 10 when religious giving is not counted.

In Boston, semi-retired carpenter Stephen Cremins said the traditional New England ideal of self-sufficiency might explain the lower giving, particularly during tight times when people have less to spare.

“Charity begins at home. I’m a big believer of that, you know, you have to take care of yourself before you can help others,” Cremins said.

The study found that in the Northeast region, including New England, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York, people gave 4.1 percent of their discretionary income to charity. The percentage was 5.2 percent in the Southern states, a region from Texas east to Delaware and Florida, and including most of the so-called Bible Belt.

The Bible mandates a 10 percent annual donation, or tithe, to the church, and the donation is commonly preached as a way to thank God, care for others and show faith in God’s provision. But it has a greater emphasis in some faiths.

In Mormon teachings, for instance, Latter-day Saints are required to pay a 10 percent tithe to remain church members in good standing, which helps explain the high giving rate in heavily Mormon Utah.

“Any LDS member who is faithful does that,” said Valerie Mason, 70, of Mesa, Ariz., during an interview in Salt Lake City. “Some struggle with it. Some leave the church because of it. But we believe in the blessing. … Tithing does bring the blessing of God’s promise.”

When only secular gifts are counted, New York climbs from No. 18 to No. 2 in giving, and Pennsylvania rises from No. 40 to No. 4.

The study was based on Internal Revenue Service records of people who itemized deductions in 2008, the most recent year statistics were available.