Six and 8-year-old siblings who last year returned from school to their New Sharon home to find their parents had overdosed on heroin and who last month were removed from that home after it was raided as an alleged meth lab have now been removed from their grandmother’s home in Standish after it, too, was raided as the site of an alleged methamphetamine manufacturing operation.

Maine Drug Enforcement Administration agents searched the home at 1 Woodland Ave. in Standish last weekend after Cumberland County sheriff’s deputies who responded to a family disturbance on Saturday saw what they suspected to be a meth laboratory in the home, State Department of Public Safety spokesman Stephen McCausland said in a news release Monday.

In the weekend raid, agents arrested Timothy Schoubroek, 32, and Tressa Sprague, 35, both of Standish, and found that five children were living at the home with their grandmother, who owns the property, McCausland said.

The five children in the grandmother’s care were removed by state officials after the raid. The five who were removed included the 6- and 8-year-old children who had previously been taken from their home in New Sharon after their parents were arrested on charges of manufacturing methamphetamine. The arrests of Daniel Villacci, 28, and Tabatha Schoubroek, 30, were made following an investigation launched when Farmington fire officials said they saw what they believed to be evidence of a meth lab in the building while battling a fire in the structure. Villacci and Tabatha Schoubroek were arrested and the children removed from the New Sharon residence.

The Standish property is owned by Bonita Logan, formerly known as Bonita Schoubroek, according to the Standish assessors’ database and documents recorded at the Cumberland County Registry of Deeds.

In the Standish raid, Timothy Schoubroek and Sprague were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine and violating bail conditions in a pending theft case. McCausland said in a statement that the couple may face charges of endangering the welfare of a child because there were children present in a building where illegal drugs were being manufactured.

After the March raid in New Sharon, Tabatha Schoubroek and Villacci were charged with endangering the welfare of a child. McCausland at the time described the situation as “horrific” and a “tragedy waiting to happen.” Villacci was ordered held on $50,000 bail in that case, and Tabatha Schoubroek was ordered held on $40,000 surety or $20,000 cash bail.

In April 2014, Villacci and Tabatha Schoubroek were charged with possession of heroin after the children came home from school and found the couple unconscious and unresponsive. One of the children called a relative who called 911 and summoned assistance. State police said at the time that the couple had overdosed on heroin.

The Standish raid was the 11th time a suspected methamphetamine manufacturing operation has been raided this year, McCausland said.