JACKIE SIMMONS AND HER BROTHER, NORMAN ALOISIO, leave their prints on the American Cancer Society’s 2015 Relay For Life banner in Brunswick Friday night. The event is the ACS’s largest fundraiser to support cancer research and to provide services to those diagnosed with and fighting cancer. This was the siblings’ fourth year at the event. Simmons said they had a sister die of breast cancer and their youngest sister is fighting colon cancer, as is Aloisio. They began relaying after Simmons had her first bout with cancer four years ago and saw the impact of the disease on her family. She has been in remission for three years. Aloisio has battled cancer now for four years. Both said it feels good to be able to walk the survivor lap, which kicks off the event every year. Those fighting cancer can sometimes feel alone as they go to treatments and feel sick day after day but at Relay as you walk that celebratory survivor lap, Aloisio said, “you know that other people have got the same problem that you’ve got and you have to deal with it and just keep on hoping.”

JACKIE SIMMONS AND HER BROTHER, NORMAN ALOISIO, leave their prints on the American Cancer Society’s 2015 Relay For Life banner in Brunswick Friday night. The event is the ACS’s largest fundraiser to support cancer research and to provide services to those diagnosed with and fighting cancer. This was the siblings’ fourth year at the event. Simmons said they had a sister die of breast cancer and their youngest sister is fighting colon cancer, as is Aloisio. They began relaying after Simmons had her first bout with cancer four years ago and saw the impact of the disease on her family. She has been in remission for three years. Aloisio has battled cancer now for four years. Both said it feels good to be able to walk the survivor lap, which kicks off the event every year. Those fighting cancer can sometimes feel alone as they go to treatments and feel sick day after day but at Relay as you walk that celebratory survivor lap, Aloisio said, “you know that other people have got the same problem that you’ve got and you have to deal with it and just keep on hoping.”

RELAYERS TAKE THE FINAL LAP at 6 a.m. Saturday during the Relay For Life at Brunswick High School. The event takes place all night to show that cancer doesn’t sleep, “and neither do we.”

RELAYERS TAKE THE FINAL LAP at 6 a.m. Saturday during the Relay For Life at Brunswick High School. The event takes place all night to show that cancer doesn’t sleep, “and neither do we.”

LUMINARIA BAGS bearing the names of those fighting or lost to cancer light the track at Brunswick High School Friday night during the annual Relay For Life event. The names of all those individuals were read aloud during an emotional ceremony.

LUMINARIA BAGS bearing the names of those fighting or lost to cancer light the track at Brunswick High School Friday night during the annual Relay For Life event. The names of all those individuals were read aloud during an emotional ceremony.

AT RIGHT, Donna Cox, left, and Cynthia Wooley carry last year’s Relay For Life survivor banner around the track at Brunswick High School Friday during the all-night fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. During a regular self breast exam Wooley noticed something was wrong and was diagnosed with breast cancer, which had spread to the lymph nodes. Fortunately it was caught early and she received her last treatment at the end of January.

AT RIGHT, Donna Cox, left, and Cynthia Wooley carry last year’s Relay For Life survivor banner around the track at Brunswick High School Friday during the all-night fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. During a regular self breast exam Wooley noticed something was wrong and was diagnosed with breast cancer, which had spread to the lymph nodes. Fortunately it was caught early and she received her last treatment at the end of January.

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