BEIRUT — In the whirlwind of Syria’s civil war, two Russian pilots parachuted from their aircraft into a chaotic front-line mountainous region near the border with Turkey after their aircraft was hit by a Turkish F-16 fighter jet.

As the two figures tumbled, almost serenely, out of the sky, they were spotted by Syrian rebels on the ground, who opened fire in their direction, hitting the pilot, Lt. Col. Oleg Peshkov, who was dead when he landed in their midst.

The co-pilot and navigator, Capt. Konstantin Murakhtin, was luckier, the wind blowing his parachute few miles closer to the front-line, nearer to government troops. There, amid the chilly ravines, he waited for more than 12 hours until a Syrian commando unit was able to reach him.

A look at the complex rescue operation offers a glimpse at the complicated, often rugged terrain in Syria’s civil war, where the front-lines are blurry. Multiple groups with shifting alliances are fighting on the ground and the sky is crowded with aircraft bombing various targets.

Both Russian airmen ejected after their aircraft was hit by a Turkish jet Tuesday. Turkey said their plane had violated Turkish airspace, a claim Russia has denied.

Adding to the day’s dramatic events, one of two Russian helicopters sent to the crash site to search for survivors was also hit by rebel fire, killing one serviceman and forcing the chopper to make an emergency landing, the Russian military said.

Syrian rebels said they hit the helicopter with a U.S.-made TOW missile, and released a video that purports to show the chopper bursting into flames.

“It was like James Bond,” said Zakaria Ahmad, a spokesman for a rebel faction operating in a rugged area known as the Turkmen mountains, where Tuesday’s operations unfolded.

The area is mostly inhabited by Syrian Turkmen, an ethnic minority with close ties to Turkey, and has recently been the site of heightened military activity amid a Syrian ground offensive and Russian airstrikes.

Some reports said Murakhtin was found by a Syrian special operations team acting together with members of the Lebanese Hezbollah group. The Syrian army said it was a joint Syrian-Russian operation.

Murakhtin, speaking in televised remarks from the Russian base in Syria where he was taken Wednesday, said he was fully confident their plane didn’t veer into the Turkish airspace, “not even for a single second.”

He denied Turkey’s claim that its jets made repeated warnings before opening fire.