WASHINGTON — The House passed the Global Health Innovation Act (H.R. 2241), to require a U.S. Agency for International Development report on the development and use of the agency’s global health programs; and passed the Patient Access and Medicare Protection Act (S. 2425).

HOUSE VOTES

House Vote 1

TAX, SPENDING PACKAGE: The House has agreed to an amendment to the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 2029) that would spend $1.149 trillion on the military and discretionary government programs in fiscal 2016, extend tax credits for wind, solar, and other forms of renewable energy, and repeal the ban on exports of crude oil. An amendment supporter, Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., called it a fair budget compromise between Republicans and Democrats that would avoid a government shutdown, prevent wasteful spending, and strengthen the military and the borders. An amendment opponent, Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Wash., said measures such as a delay in the health insurance premium tax and reduced funding for the health insurance risk corridor program undermined the health care reform law. The vote, on Dec. 18, was 316 yeas to 113 nays.

YEAS: Chellie Pingree, D-1st District; Bruce Poliquin, R-2nd District

SENATE VOTES

Senate Vote 1

WAIVING BUDGET RULES FOR TAX, SPENDING BILL: The Senate has agreed to a motion to waive a budgetary point of order regarding the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 2029). A supporter of applying the point of order, Sen. Joe Manchin III, D-W.Va., said it would force Congress to do separate votes on tax and spending bills that violate the fiscal year 2016 budget agreement and add to the nation’s already formidable debt burden. An opponent of applying the point of order, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., called it an obstacle to the goal of passing legislation that stabilizes the tax code and puts Congress “on a path toward achieving bipartisan comprehensive tax reform.” The vote to waive the point of order, on Dec. 18, was 73 yeas to 25 nays.

YEAS: Susan Collins R-Maine

NAYS: Angus King I-Maine

Senate Vote 2

CLEARING TAX, SPENDING LEGISLATION: The Senate has agreed to the House amendments to the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 2029). The amendments would extend or make permanent an estimated $622 billion package of tax incentives and tax credits, including the earned income and child tax credits, and spend $1.149 trillion on the military and discretionary government programs in fiscal 2016, extend tax credits for wind, solar, and other forms of renewable energy, and repeal the ban on exports of crude oil. A supporter of the amendments, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., said the funding provided for the military will work to develop new technologies to improve national security, maintain robust funding for intelligence activities, and bolster counter-Russian military efforts in Europe. An opponent of the amendments, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., said the tax extensions would add hundreds of billions of dollars to the government’s debt, taking the nation further away from a sound fiscal footing. The vote, on Dec. 18, was 65 yeas to 33 nays.

YEAS: Collins, King