BRUNSWICK POLICE reported that Buddy was thrown against a wall multiple times. According to Coastal Humane Society staff, the black lab has recovered well at the Brunswick facility.

BRUNSWICK POLICE reported that Buddy was thrown against a wall multiple times. According to Coastal Humane Society staff, the black lab has recovered well at the Brunswick facility.

BRUNSWICK

Coastal Humane Society announced Friday that Buddy, the abused black lab that was treated at the shelter, will be headed to Michigan to enroll in an elite prison program that rehabilitates and trains dogs.

The Making Pawsitive Changes program in Kinross, Michigan, also provides prisoners at the Kinross Correctional Facility with the opportunity to develop empathy, patience and respect while teaching enrolled dogs basic skills to increase their chances of finding permanent homes.

Brunswick police reported that Buddy was thrown against a wall multiple times. The dog had previously sustained a broken leg that was amputated at the shelter. According to shelter care staff, he has recovered well, adjusting quickly to life on three legs.

Despite his physical recovery, Buddy has shown signs of stress and anxiety. Dr. Mandie Wehr, Coastal Humane Society’s veterinarian and director of shelter operations, knew that the Pawsitive Changes program would be right for him. She is familiar with the facility and has observed the program firsthand, even meeting canine graduates of the program.

“We didn’t want to put him through the stress of our adoption center where there are lots of people and animals going through,” said Wehr. “This program will help him rebuild trust in people before going up for adoption. We’ve tended to his physical wounds — this program will see to his behavioral rehabilitation.”

Buddy will head to Michigan after he has been neutered and is no longer needed by the police department in the case against his former owner.

Coastal Humane Society Executive Director Joe Montisano will be driving Buddy as far as Ohio, where he’ll meet up with Holly Henderson, the director of the Pawsitive Changes program.

“For dogs such as Buddy, our program helps to teach them that the world is indeed a safe place for them to live in and they don’t have to worry about being punished for acting like a dog,” Henderson said.

After about 12 weeks in the program, Buddy will be placed for adoption through the Chippewa County Animal Shelter in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Montisano believes this is the perfect fit for Buddy.

“I am confident going into the Making Pawsitive Changes program is the best thing for Buddy as he makes this transition,” he said. “It will allow him to heal not just physically, because animals are resilient in that capacity, but heal emotionally. He has to learn to trust humans again and is justifiably nervous around us. This program will give him the time to adjust and learn new skills, and he will end up in a happy home. It is a great ending to a story that had a very sad start.”


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