Bub Peter Nguany, of Old Orchard Beach, center, was sentenced Monday to 40 years in prison in connection with the March 2013 murder of 47-year-old Charles Raybine in Biddeford. ALAN BENNETT/Journal Tribune

Bub Peter Nguany, of Old Orchard Beach, center, was sentenced Monday to 40 years in prison in connection with the March 2013 murder of 47-year-old Charles Raybine in Biddeford. ALAN BENNETT/Journal Tribune

PORTLAND — A Cumberland County Superior Court judge has sentenced an Old Orchard Beach man to 40 years in prison in connection with the March 2013 murder of Charles Raybine in Biddeford. 

Justice Daniel Billings Sentenced Bub Peter Nguany to 40 years in prison for murder following a lengthy, emotional sentencing that included speeches given by Raybine’s family and Nguany himself. 

Bub Peter Nguany watches a slideshow of family photos of Charles Raybine at Cumberland County Superior Court on Monday. Nguany was sentenced to 40 years in prison in connection to Raybine’s March 2013 murder. ALAN BENNETT/Journal Tribune

Bub Peter Nguany watches a slideshow of family photos of Charles Raybine at Cumberland County Superior Court on Monday. Nguany was sentenced to 40 years in prison in connection to Raybine’s March 2013 murder. ALAN BENNETT/Journal Tribune

Nguany was also given a concurrent 20-year sentence for conspiracy to commit murder, having pleaded guilty to both charges earlier this month. He was also slapped with a $9,000 fine as reimbursement for funeral costs to Raybine’s family. 

Raybine, 47, was killed in the early hours of March 26, 2013, having been shot three times in the face in the parking lot of the Parish Place apartment complex on Birch Street in what police believe was a drug-related crime. He was sitting in a rental car at the time. 

A police affidavit shows officers responded to the scene around 1 a.m., when Raybine’s nephew, Morgan “Mo” Palmer, called 911. Palmer told police he and Raybine had been playing cards, drinking and smoking crack in one of the apartments. 

The two left the apartment and got into Raybine’s rental car when, according to the affidavit, two cars drove up to the parking lot, and a black man got out of one and approached Raybine’s vehicle. 

The man approached Raybine and asked, “Yo, who you with, who’s this?” Raybine responded saying, “That’s Mo,” and then the man shot him three times in the face, Palmer told police. 

Nguany was arrested in connection with the crime later that morning in Old Orchard Beach. Police searched his backpack and found a .45-caliber handgun with ammunition matching shell casings recovered from the crime scene.

Two others have plead guilty in connection with Raybine’s murder. Mohamed Mohamed, a transient from Portland, pleaded guilty earlier this month to charges of conspiracy to commit murder and was sentenced to seven years, with all but three suspended. 

John Lopez, of Old Orchard Beach, pleaded guilty to felony murder but has yet to be sentenced. 

Nguany watched stoically as Raybine’s family played a 9-minute slideshow of family photos before the court, following up the presentation with impact statements. 

Raybine’s family remembered him as intelligent, charismatic and a good father, saying he was someone who went out of his way to help those struggling with addiction despite struggling with his own for years. 

“Charlie had a presence like no other. He was involved in the recovery community for several years,” Geneva Howes, a friend of Raybine’s, said before the court. “Charlie went above and beyond helping others in recovery and those who were still active in their addiction.” 

Lori DePeter, with whom Raybine has an adult son, spoke at length about how her son’s life has been affected by his father’s murder. She said since Raybine’s death, her son — whom she asked to remain anonymous — has struggled with depression, and hasn’t smiled the same way since his father was alive.  

“The defendant gave no thought to my son or anyone else, for that matter,” DePeter said. “If i had one wish it would be to have Charlie Jr. back in our lives, and have the son I once had in mine, but i know that will never happen.

“This crime has left my life void of so many things that brought me joy,” DePeter continued. “I have absolutely no compassion for this defendant, and I hate him for what he has done to my child.”

Raybine’s widow, Lori Raybine, also spoke at the sentencing, saying her husband showed her a love that went beyond unconditional love. She said she was horrified to realize her husband died alone. 

“I always lived in comfort knowing he would have held me in his arms if I were dying,” she said. “My life was annihilated at 1:30 a.m. March 26, 2013.”

Nguany himself spoke before the court saying he was truly sorry for what happened, telling Raybine’s family he prays for them every day. 

“I know every time you guys hear my name or have a court date it’s a bitter pill to swallow. The reality of everything you guys are going through becomes real.” Nguany said. “I cannot be mad at you guys to feel angry at me. As a family you love the person that passed away.

“Everything that transpired is — I’m sorry. I really, truly am sorry,” he said. 

Nguany’s mother, Fetelwork Zegye, broke down in tears as her son apologized to his own family, saying he didn’t intend for his life to turn out how it had. 

Prior to her son’s sentencing, Zegye said Nguany was always a “good boy,” who “had a good heart.” 

“He never talked back to me. Never,” she said, saying she’ll also never give up on her son. “I love him, I wish him the best and I wish he learned from this. I supported him and I’ll be with him and I’ll pray for him. I hope this is over.” 

Upon sentencing, Billings told the court that nothing he could say or impose upon Nguany would feel adequate to Raybine’s family, but said the agreed upon 40-year sentence felt appropriate given Nguany’s confession and statements of remorse. 

“Mr. Nguany, I hope your expressions of remorse here today are genuine. You’re going to be doing a lot of time in prison and that’s appropriate,” Billings said to the defendant. “You can do hard time, or you can try to make the best of it and make yourself a better person. One day you will get out.” 

Following the sentencing, Raybine’s family stood behind the bar. When asked if she felt the sentence was appropriate, Lori Raybine said she felt it was. 

“It’s OK,” she said, taking a moment. “I’m OK with it.” 

— Staff Writer Alan Bennett can be contacted at 282-1535, ext. 329 or [email protected] 


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