In a perverse way, we should be glad that President Trump has declared his intention to withdraw from the Paris climate accord.

His earlier actions and statements let us know he was going to do nothing to lessen the tsunami of changes in the air, on the land and in the oceans that has already begun.

Now Congress knows it must act.

If the U.S. is to retain its position of leadership in the critical arena of clean energy, Congress must act. If our coastal cities like Portland are to remain fully habitable, if our national security is to remain intact, if our health is to improve with cleaner air, if our economy is to remain globally competitive, Congress must act.

The good news – and there is good news! – is that Congress is increasingly prepared to act. A growing Climate Solutions Caucus in the House already has 40 members, half Republicans.

Meanwhile, our senators, Susan Collins and Angus King, recently voted in the majority to retain limits on the powerful greenhouse gas methane on federal lands.

I’m among 10 Mainers heading to Washington this weekend to lobby our four members of Congress to act boldly and soon to lessen changes in the climate by putting a constantly rising price on carbon pollution.

We are members of Maine chapters of the nonpartisan Citizens Climate Lobby, a national group laser-focused year-round on Congress to price carbon and return all proceeds to all Americans. It’s a broadly supported proposal called carbon fee and dividend.

We’ll be among a thousand other Citizens Climate Lobby members meeting with 500 members of Congress on Tuesday to support such a bill. I went to D.C. last November for the same purpose and was encouraged by the responses from Collins, King, Rep. Chellie Pingree and Rep. Bruce Poliquin. We should all urge them to act now.

Peter Monro

Portland