SECAUCUS, N.J. — The Minnesota Twins think they’ve got their shortstop of the future in the speedy and slick-fielding Royce Lewis.

The California high school star was taken with the No. 1 pick in the Major League Baseball draft Monday night. It was the third time the Twins led off the draft, and first since they took hometown high school catcher Joe Mauer in 2001.

“My body just went numb,” Lewis said during an interview with MLB Network. “It was an unbelievable feeling.”

Lewis played both shortstop and outfield in high school. But the Twins, who lead the AL Central after going 59-103 last year, classified him as a shortstop when Commissioner Rob Manfred made the announcement at MLB Network studios.

The 6-foot, 1-inch, 185-pound Lewis hit .377 with four homers and 25 stolen bases for JSerra Catholic High School, establishing himself as a top prospect with excellent speed and a solid bat.

“This guy gets it,” said Mike Radcliff, the Twins’ vice president for player personnel. “He’s got that ‘it’ factor that a No. 1 pick needs to survive and move forward and have success at the end of the journey. He checked all the boxes for us.”

Lewis was a standout on USA Baseball’s gold medal-winning Under-18 team at the Pan American Championships last year and was selected as this year’s National High School Coaches Association’s high school senior baseball athlete of the year.

With the second pick, Cincinnati took California high school right-hander Hunter Greene, one of the top two-way talents in a draft stocked with them.

Greene, chosen as a pitcher, also played shortstop at Notre Dame High School, but a fastball that can reach 100 mph has the Reds projecting him as a future ace. He was 3-0 with a 0.75 ERA and 43 strikeouts with only four walks in 28 innings this season. Greene, featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated this season, also batted .324 with six homers and 28 RBI.

The first of four prospects in attendance at the draft site to be selected, Greene was asked to give a scouting report on himself as a pitcher.

“Man, I’m a monster,” he said, chuckling. “I’m different on the field than I am off the field.”

At No. 3, San Diego selected North Carolina high school left-hander MacKenzie Gore.

With his big leg kick, Gore throws a fastball that sits in the low- to mid-90s (mph) to go along with a knee-buckling curve. He also has a hard slider and solid change-up in his arsenal.

It was the first time since 1990 that the top three picks were all high school players.