Do you enjoy the occasional cocktail?

Beware, because even moderate consumption of alcohol can increase your risk of cancer, according to a new report.

Researchers from the American Society of Clinical Oncology recently conducted an experiment, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, to determine the link between drinking and the disease.

To do so, they looked at several studies that found a strong correlation between alcohol and cancer.

After gathering all the data, they concluded that about 3.5 percent of all cancer-related deaths were because of alcohol consumption.

Furthermore, in 2012, they discovered that about 5.5 percent of all new cancer occurrences and 5.8 percent of all cancer deaths worldwide were attributable to drinking alcohol.

“The importance of alcohol drinking as a contributing factor to the overall cancer burden is often underappreciated,” the organization said.

“Associations between alcohol drinking and cancer risk have been observed consistently regardless of the specific type of alcoholic beverages.”

While researchers noted the greatest risk was among those with heavy and long-term use and those who also smoked cigarettes, moderate drinking is risky, too. Scientists described moderate as up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men.

This was particularly the case with oropharyngeal and breast cancer.

“A meta-analysis that focused solely on cancer risks associated with drinking one drink or fewer per day observed that this level of alcohol consumption was still associated with some elevated risk for … oropharyngeal cancer and breast cancer,” the authors wrote.