OAKLAND, Calif. — Klay Thompson danced unabashedly in China after winning another NBA championship, and it got shared all over social media. He smoked a stogie on the rooftop, letting loose to reveal another side of himself.

“I didn’t plan for that video to go viral,” Thompson said matter-of-factly. “I was just having fun. I’ve always been myself and having fun while doing it, and learning to enjoy every day because it goes by so fast.”

But coming to that mindset has been a process for the seventh-year Golden State guard who acknowledges for so long he put extreme pressure on himself to be the best.

The quiet, most under-the-radar Warriors All-Star of the bunch, Thompson has provided a steadying hand early on for the reigning NBA champions, who are favored to capture a third title in four years.

“I used to stress a lot more at the beginning of my career about my performance,” Thompson said. “Now, it’s not like I don’t stress, but I play more carefree and I’m more able, if I play as hard as I can, I’m satisfied with the results. … I used to compare myself with all players and want to be the best so badly, but now it’s all about winning and having fun, and realizing basketball is a team sport than anything.”

After a recent practice, Thompson dazzled right alongside a couple visiting Harlem Globetrotters, spinning the ball on his finger, rolling it up and down his arms, off his knee and then a foot soccer-style before swishing a short jumper.

“I should have been a Globetrotter!” he yelled.

It’s a new look for this hang-loose, beach-loving Splash Brother.

The approach is working for the Warriors.

“He still carries the threat. You have to honor him,” Orlando Coach Frank Vogel said. “He’s great at making the right play. Their whole team is. I think he’s trying to fit in with their whole buy-in that ball movement and passing is greater than any one man carrying the bulk of it.”

Still, his numbers are stellar. Thompson has had a fast start this season, which previously wasn’t been the case.

Thompson credits familiarity with teammates and a comfort in Coach Steve Kerr’s offense.

“He’s taken another step in his game. Just the experience that he’s had in his career, every year he’s gotten better, and I think this year he’s shown how at the end of the season he carried it over to the beginning of this year,” backcourt mate Stephen Curry said.

“Historically, he hadn’t started seasons well, but this year he’s locked in. He’s obviously shooting the ball well and playing great defense, but I think the biggest thing is his playmaking in situations where he’s drawing a crowd. He’s making great decisions setting guys up and just playing under control.”

Life off the court also is great for Thompson, and that helps him be stress-free on it.

He threw out the first pitch at an Oakland Athletics game in July, then drove an IndyCar in September while serving as Grand Marshal of a series stop in Sonoma.

Thompson shares his training tricks on social media and posts photos with his bulldog, Rocco.

He recently donated $75,000 to relief efforts in the aftermath of the devastating Northern California wildfires, committing $1,000 per point for a three-game stretch during which he scored 69 points – but added to that total.

Thompson used to get teased for his lack of assists, and it remains a running joke.

“I’ve got thick skin,” Thompson said. “Honestly, I don’t really care.”

That carefree approach has taken time, and the Warriors are better for it.