WASHINGTON — President Trump doesn’t know who to believe about sexual misconduct allegations involving Roy Moore, but isn’t campaigning for his party’s Senate candidate in Alabama because of “discomfort” with the claims made by a number of women, aides said Sunday.

Moore, a former state Supreme Court justice twice removed from office, has denied the accusations that have surfaced only recently about incidents said to have occurred decades ago, and pledged to remain in the race.

The special election will determine who fills the remainder of Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ term, until January 2020.

White House aides said Trump had “serious concerns” about Moore, but that Alabamans should decide Moore’s fate against Democrat Doug Jones, a former prosecutor.

“I think that’s probably the most common sense way to look at it. He doesn’t know who to believe. I think a lot of folks don’t,” budget director Mick Mulvaney said.

Legislative director Marc Short said that “obviously if (Trump) did not believe that the women’s accusations were credible, he would be down campaigning for Roy Moore.”

Still, Short said Trump also had questions about allegations that were “38 years old” and virtually unprovable.

“Roy Moore has been a public servant for decades in Alabama. He has run multiple times. The people of Alabama know best what to do and the right decision to make here,” he said.

Before the allegations emerged, Trump had backed current Republican Sen. Luther Strange in the Sept. 26 primary to determine Sessions’ successor.