CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — An independent report that found serious police and government failures in responding to violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville this summer also accuses police agencies of putting up roadblocks to the investigation.

The report released Friday by former U.S. Attorney Tim Heaphy said Virginia State Police refused to make commanders on the ground at the Aug. 12 rally available for interviews or to provide most documents requested. It also said Charlottesville Police Chief Al Thomas deleted relevant text messages and made officers fearful of retaliation for speaking with investigators.

Thomas’ lawyer denied that texts were deleted. He spoke at a news conference in which community activists peppered Heaphy with questions and shouted at Thomas, illustrating the deep distrust between some of Charlottesville’s citizens and law enforcement after white nationalists descended on the Virginia city over its decision to remove a Confederate monument.

“We are a community divided. We are still a community in crisis,” Thomas said.

The report’s findings come a little over three months after the rally, which was believed to be the largest gathering of white nationalists in at least a decade. Street fights erupted between white nationalists and counterdemonstrators before the event officially began, and the brawling lasted nearly an hour in view of officers until authorities forced the crowd to disband.

Later, as counterdemonstrators were peacefully marching downtown, a car drove into the crowd, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring many more.

Heaphy’s report was sharply critical of Thomas’ response as the violence began to escalate that day.