The Los Angeles Dodgers claimed left-hander Henry Owens on waivers Friday, adding a fallen prospect to their stash of pitching depth.

The Boston Red Sox selected Owens in the first round of the 2011 draft, ahead of outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. Owens twice was ranked among the top 50 prospects by Baseball America, but he lost velocity and struggled with command when he arrived in the major leagues.

Owens started 16 games for the Red Sox in 2015-16, with a 4-6 record and 5.19 earned-run average. He also walked 44 in 85 innings.

His command completely betrayed him last season. In 126 innings split between Double-A Portland and Triple-A Pawtucket, he walked 115, hit 17 batters and threw 17 wild pitches.

The Dodgers claimed Owens on waivers from the Arizona Diamondbacks, who had claimed him two weeks ago after the Red Sox removed him from their 40-man roster. The Diamondbacks needed to clear a roster spot for Japanese reliever Yoshihisa Hirano, whom they signed to a two-year contract on Friday.

INDIANS: Yonder Alonso changed his swing last season and his statistics soared. The Indians hope they can rise even more.

Alonso, who reached a career high in home runs and made the All-Star team for the first time, signed a two-year, $16 million contract with Cleveland, which found a less expensive replacement for first baseman Carlos Santana.

Alonso’s deal, which includes a $9 million club option for 2020, was agreed to earlier in the week. He passed medical tests Friday to finalize the package.

Last year, Alonso altered the “launch angle” in his swing and the ball began to jump off his bat. With a previous season high of nine homers in 2012 for San Diego, Alonso connected for 28 with Oakland and Seattle. Beyond tweaking his swing, Alonso, who hits left-handed, said a commitment to getting stronger pushed up his power numbers.

“It started about two years ago,” he said. “A lot of times I’m in the weight room and I’m just a lot stronger than a lot of guys, and I feel healthier than I’ve ever been, and I felt like I needed to make some changes. I think for a baseball player, in itself to make changes is very hard, but I was able to get through that and realize that my body and my strength wasn’t the problem. It started obviously mentally and it carried on physically.

“I changed some things up with my lower half. I got more flexible. I was able to be more explosive when I was attacking the ball, and after just let my ability take over.”

The Indians had a hole at first after Santana signed a three-year, $60 million contract with Philadelphia. It remains to be seen if Alonso can be as productive as Santana, who became a cornerstone, dependable player, but the 30-year-old fit into Cleveland’s budget and the Indians believe his big season was not a fluke.

“It was a purposeful adjustment that Yonder made with both his approach and also some things with his swing that led to the increased productivity this year,” Indians President Chris Antonetti said. “But it’s also not a one-year trend. If you look at the underlying numbers for him, he’s been a guy who has typically controlled the strike zone, been patient at the plate, and this year he made an adjustment to that approach and hit for some more power.

“That’s also continuing a trend of building on improved exit velocities over the course of the last three or four seasons.”

Alonso, who entered last season with just 39 career homers, also reached personal bests in runs (72), walks (68), on-base percentage (.365), slugging percentage (.501) and OPS (.866).