OKLAHOMA CITY — Oklahoma lawmakers approved an additional $40 million for public schools Friday, but the head of the state’s largest teacher’s union said it was going to take more than that to end a walkout that has led to five straight days of school closures.

Two bills approved by the state Senate – one taxing certain internet sales and another expanding tribal gambling – will be sent to Gov. Mary Fallin, who will decide whether to sign the revenue-raising plans into law.

Oklahoma Education Association President Alicia Priest told teachers rallying at the Capitol that lawmakers must eliminate a capital gains tax exemption and the governor must veto a repeal of a proposed lodging tax to end the protests.

“We’ve always shown a roadmap forward, and the Legislature has had all the opportunities to make the votes and pass the funding,” Priest said. “Everything is in their corner.”

Some of Oklahoma’s largest school districts have already canceled classes on Monday in anticipation of continued protests.

The Oklahoma Legislature typically does not meet on Fridays, but protesting teachers had packed the Capitol for five days, adding pressure for elected leaders to act.

Oklahoma is the second state where teachers have gone on strike this year. West Virginia teachers won a 5 percent pay increase after striking for nine days. That ignited protests in other Republican-led states, including Kentucky and Arizona.

Fallin has faced the brunt of criticism from teachers, many of whom blame the term-limited governor for supporting tax cuts and generous state subsidies for businesses that have led to declines in state funding for schools and other state services. The governor further raised the ire of teachers after an interview this week in which she likened striking teachers to a “teenage kid that wants a better car.”

Dozens of protesters inside the packed Capitol responded Wednesday by jangling their keys in the Capitol rotunda and chanting “Where’s our car?”