A Superior Court judge heard oral arguments Wednesday on whether the state should proceed with ranked-choice voting.

Here are the questions on ranked-choice voting to be posed to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court:

1. Has the Senate proven that the Secretary of State’s commitment for expenditure of funds in the June 12 primary election constitutes a violation of the Legislature’s appropriation authority or the separation of powers clause in the Maine Constitution?

2. Has the Senate proven that the current statutory framework does not provide sufficient authority for the Secretary of State to arrange for the retrieval and transport of ballots cast by voters in the primary election from municipalities to a central location in order to determine the winners of the election by ranked choice voting?

3. Has the Senate proven that the current statutory framework, some of which are suspended by the People’s Veto petition, pursuant to the Constitution of Maine, prohibits determining the winners of the primary by ranked choice voting?

4. Has the Senate shown it has standing to bring any and all legal claims set forth in its complaint?

5. Has the Senate shown that any or all of the legal claims set forth in the Senate’s complaint are subject to a trial in a court of law under the Political Question Doctrine?

6. Has the Senate shown that any or all of the legal claims set forth in its complaint are ripe for adjudication?

7. Has the Senate identified a cause of action for any of the legal claims set forth in its complaint?


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