CARLSBAD, Calif. — The rebuilding Chicago White Sox have extended Manager Rick Renteria’s contract.

General Manager Rick Hahn declined to give specifics Wednesday other than the extension goes past 2019, when Renteria’s original three-year deal was set to end.

Renteria, who managed the Portland Sea Dogs in 2001 and 2001, is 129-195 in two seasons with the White Sox, including 62-100 this year. Prior to being hired, he managed the Chicago Cubs to a 73-89 record in 2014.

Hahn said Renteria, 56, is a great fit with the young White Sox.

“We felt at the time we hired him he was the right guy to begin the early processes of this rebuild and then stay with us through the time we think we’re able to contend for championships,” Hahn said at the general managers’ meetings. “On the front end, on the rebuild part, at the core, he’s a teacher. … As we eventually move into a phase where we’re ready to win and have a roster that’s capable of winning championships, we believe he’s the right guy in terms of the culture he’s created and the accountability he’s created and the ability to steward a championship-caliber club.”

The White Sox haven’t had a winning season since 2012. They last made the playoffs in 2008, losing to Tampa Bay in the AL Division Series.

YANKEES: Months before the start of spring training, the Yankees’ injury list is lengthening.

Catcher Gary Sanchez will have surgery on his left shoulder in the next week, which could slow him during spring training but is not likely to keep him out of the lineup on opening day.

“His shoulder has bothered him off and on since ’17,” Yankees GM Brian Cashman said Wednesday. “He’s been treated conservatively with it. He had an injection towards the end of ’17. He had two in ’18. He just resumed workouts and still felt a little bit lingering from it.”

Cashman made the announcement at the general managers’ meetings, hours after the Yankees finalized an $8 million, one-year contract with CC Sabathia. The 38-year-old left-hander said 2019 will be his final season.

New York announced last month that Didi Gregorius will miss much of next season after Tommy John surgery to repair a torn ligament in the shortstop’s right elbow.

An All-Star in 2017 who slumped badly this year, Sanchez felt continued shoulder pain while working out last week at the Yankees’ minor league complex in Tampa, Florida, with strength and conditioning coach Matt Krause.

“He said things are going well, but my shoulder is still cranky. It’s still lingering in there,” Cashman said. “So it’s just enough complaints, too many over the course of a year-and-half now.”

Cashman said head team physician Dr. Christopher Ahmad will perform a debridement to remove loose debris from Sanchez’s non-throwing shoulder. The recovery is expected to be about three months.

Sanchez, 25, hit .299 with 20 homers and 42 RBI two years ago, when he impressed during a call-up in the season’s final two months, and he was an All-Star in 2017 who hit .278 with 33 homers and 90 RBI in 122 games. But he slumped to a .186 with 18 homers and 53 RBI in 89 games this year, when he was limited by a groin injury, and his defense was poor for the second straight year.

“It may very well have been something that affected him performance-wise. I can’t rule that out,” Cashman said.

BLUE JAYS: The Blue Jays hired Astros hitting coach Dave Hudgens as their bench coach under new manager Charlie Montoyo.

Hudgens, 61, spent the past four seasons with Houston, where he won a World Series championship in 2017. He was the hitting coach for the New York Mets (2011 to 2014) and the Oakland Athletics (1999, 2003 to 2005) before that.

DeMarlo Hale previously served as Toronto’s bench coach from 2013-2018.

METS: Minor leaguer Tim Tebow has earned a promotion to Triple-A Syracuse.

The 2007 Heisman Trophy winner and former NFL quarterback hit .273 with six homers and 36 RBI in 84 games this year for Double-A Binghamton. His season was cut short by a broken hamate bone in his right hand, which required surgery July 24.

“Timmy is not a guy you want to put restraints on,” new Mets general manager Brodie Van Wagenen said Wednesday. “If he sees a block, he’s going to work that much harder to go overcome whatever somebody places on him. I believe in him.”

Before he was hired by the Mets last week, Van Wagenen worked at CAA Baseball and represented the 31-year-old outfielder.

Tebow hit .301 in June for Binghamton and .340 in 15 games in July.

“Given the hamate injury he had last year, his momentum was stopped,” Van Wagenen said, “The goal is if he can pick that up in spring training and hopefully get off to a good start in Syracuse, then we’ll evaluate it when he’s ready.”

Tebow signed with Mets in late 2016, played in the Arizona Fall League and in 2017 hit .226 with eight homers and 52 RBI in 126 games at two levels of Class A. He played in seven games for the Mets during in spring training this year, hitting .056 (1 for 18).

DODGERS: The Dodgers exercised their option on Dave Roberts’ contract for 2019 while continuing to work on a long-term deal for the manager who has taken the team to consecutive World Series.

Roberts just finished his third season as the Dodgers’ skipper, when Los Angeles lost the World Series in five games to the Boston Red Sox. The Dodgers lost the 2017 World Series in seven games to the Houston Astros.

He has led the Dodgers to seasons of 91, 104 and 92 wins, and is 287-200 overall.

BRAVES: Shortstop Dansby Swanson is expected to be ready for spring training following surgery on his left wrist.

The Braves said Swanson had a procedure on Monday to remove a “loose body” in the wrist.

The 24-year-old Swanson hit .238 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 136 games last season. He was left off the National League Division Series roster against the Los Angeles Dodgers after tearing a ligament in his left hand late in the season. His hand and wrist were examined at the time.

GM MEETINGS: The agent for free agent Bryce Harper and many of baseball’s top players claims rebuilding teams have become a “competitive cancer” that caused this season’s 4 percent attendance drop.

As the sport’s officials start to consider possible rules changes to spark offense and speed pace, Scott Boras acidly critiqued several clubs that were among the 17 to draw fewer fans this year than last.

Boras pointed out Louisiana State’s baseball team had a higher average attendance for its 37 home games than the Miami Marlins did for their 81 – 10,786 to 10,014.

“The fans of Florida have certainly brought the MIA to Miami,” he said in a courtyard outside the general managers’ meetings.

He claimed when “the divisional clubs come to Minnesota, it’s gotten so bad that only one of the Twins shows up.”

And he criticized the Toronto Blue Jays, who had the biggest decrease in the major leagues this year, falling by 878,000 fans to 2.33 million.

“They’ve lost near a third of their fan base due to the blue flu of not bringing attractive players the fans find interesting to their market,” he said.

Boras has self interest in encouraging spending, wanting fewer clubs jettisoning veterans in favor of youth and more handing out lucrative contracts – especially to his clients.

Major League Baseball’s average attendance dropped to 28,830, its lowest since 2003 after 14 consecutive seasons topping 30,000, and six ballparks set record lows. Boras connected the drop to non-competitive clubs: There were three 100-loss teams for the second time since 1985 and the first since a record four in 2002. And there were eight 95-loss teams for the first time in big league history.

“The reality of it is they’re losing their fan base, and it costs millions and millions of dollars to rebuild the fan base,” he said.

Boras is seeking a record contract for Harper, topping outfielder Giancarlo Stanton’s $325 million, 13-year deal through 2027 reached with the Miami Marlins, who traded him to the New York Yankees last December. Boras sounded as if he had rehearsed his zingers like a stand-up comedian.

“Certainly Harper’s bazaar has begun,” he said. “It’s fashionable. It’s historical. It’s elite. It’s global, certainly. And certainly it has inspirations that deal with great shoes and great hair.”

Washington made a late-season offer before Harper became a free agent at the unusually young age of 26. Nationals GM Mike Rizzo said Harper didn’t respond.

“He’s going to go about his business and we’re going to go about our business,” Rizzo said. “We drafted, signed, developed him. He turned into one of the best players in the league with our uniform on.”