LOS ANGELES — Magic Johnson abruptly quit as the Los Angeles Lakers’ president of basketball operations Tuesday night, citing his desire to return to the simpler life he enjoyed as a wealthy businessman and beloved former player before taking charge of this franchise just over two years ago.

Johnson didn’t tell owner Jeanie Buss or General Manager Rob Pelinka before he stepped in front of reporters about 90 minutes before the final game of the Lakers’ sixth consecutive losing season. Los Angeles was 37-44 heading into its game against Portland, missing the playoffs yet again despite the offseason addition of LeBron James.

“I want to go back to having fun,” Johnson said before fighting off tears. “I want to go back to being who I was before taking on this job. We’re halfway there with LeBron coming (last summer). I think this summer, with that other star coming in, whoever is going to bring him in, I think this team is really going to be in position to contend for a championship with the growth of the young players.”

Johnson didn’t directly tie his decision to the future of Luke Walton, but the third-year coach was widely expected to be fired by Johnson. Without using names, Johnson repeatedly mentioned Buss’ affinity for Walton, who was in place before Johnson got the job in February 2017, and Johnson’s desire not to cause upheaval between the owner and her chosen coach.

“(On Wednesday) I would have to affect somebody’s livelihood and their life,” Johnson said. “And I thought about it and I said, ‘That’s not fun for me. That’s not who I am.’ And then I don’t want to put her in the middle of us, even though she said, ‘Hey, you can do what you want to do.’ I know she has great love for him and great love for me.”

Johnson also said he is tired of being investigated or fined by the NBA for tampering when he comments on basketball on Twitter or even speaks to another organization’s player.

Johnson, a longtime broadcaster and beloved basketball figure before moving into the front office, has been investigated four times for tampering after everything from a joking comment about Paul George on Jimmy Kimmel’s talk show to his response to an email sent to him by Philadelphia’s Ben Simmons.

“I thought about Dwyane Wade retiring (Wednesday), and I can’t even tweet that out or be there,” Johnson said. “Serena Williams called me a week ago and said, ‘Will you mentor me and be on my advisory board?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, I’m going to do that.’ So when Ben Simmons called and we went through the proper channels and they made me look like the bad guy out of that situation, but I didn’t do anything wrong … I was thinking about all those times, all those guys who want me to mentor them or be a part of their lives, and I can’t even do that. I had more fun on the other side.”

Johnson mentioned other teams’ irate responses to his perceived tampering as another factor in his desire to get back to his regular life. Johnson has many thriving business interests, along with ownership stakes in the Los Angeles Dodgers and Los Angeles FC.

“Also what I didn’t like is the backstabbing and the whispering,” Johnson said, later clarifying that he didn’t mean within the Lakers, but around the league.

“I don’t like a lot of things that went on that didn’t have to go on,” Johnson said. “I hope that after (the season ends), the Lakers can head in the right direction, which we are. Injuries really hurt us, but I enjoyed working with Jeanie.”

Johnson was hired along with Pelinka in February 2017 when Buss dismissed her brother, Jim, and GM Mitch Kupchak. The Buss children’s father, Jerry, had long envisioned Johnson in a powerful role in the Lakers’ front office, and Jeanie shook up her franchise in the midst of its lengthy decline.

The Lakers have missed the playoffs in each of their three springs since Johnson and Pelinka took over. They’re finishing this season with their best record in six years, but they were eliminated from playoff contention on March 22.

The 16-time NBA champions had never missed the playoffs more than two consecutive seasons before this six-year drought.

CLIPPERS: Los Angeles claimed guard Rodney McGruder off waivers, although he won’t be eligible to play in the postseason.

McGruder, a former Maine Red Claws player, averaged 7.6 points, 3.6 rebounds and 1.7 assists in 66 games for the Miami Heat this season. He’s been with them for three seasons.

TUESDAY’S GAMES

PISTONS 100, GRIZZLIES 93: Andre Drummond had 20 points and 17 rebounds, and Ish Smith matched a season high with 22 points, helping Detroit come back from a 22-point deficit to beat visiting Memphis and cling to a spot in the playoffs.

Detroit can clinch a postseason bid by closing the regular season with a win Wednesday night at New York.

HORNETS 124, CAVALIERS 97: Kemba Walker scored 23 points and Charlotte pulled away in the fourth quarter at Cleveland to keep its playoff hopes alive.

The Hornets must beat Orlando at home on Wednesday and hope Detroit loses in New York to clinch its first playoff berth in three years.

HEAT 122, 76ERS 99: Dwyane Wade scored 30 points in the tribute-filled final home game of his career, and Miami defeated Philadelphia.

Bam Adebayo scored 19 points, Justise Winslow finished with 16 and Hassan Whiteside added 15 for the Heat, who were eliminated from playoff contention when Detroit beat Memphis.