From contemporary soul and classic rock to timeless American standards, Maine’s concert venues will be hosting a wide variety of pop music this fall. Here are a few shows to consider as you are planning your fall music calendar.

Sept. 17 – Lucinda Williams, 8 p.m., State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland, $30 to $65, statetheatreportland.com. The three-time Grammy winner is touring to mark the 20th anniversary of her “Car Wheels on a Gravel Road” album. Williams, 66, has influenced a generation or two of singer-songwriters in rock, folk, blues and country.

Oct. 6 – Deep Purple, 7 p.m., Merrill Auditorium, 20 Myrtle St., Portland, $59.75 to $159.75, porttix.com. One of the “unholy trinity of British hard rock,” along with Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, Deep Purple has been around for 50 years and is still playing hard-hitting tunes like “Smoke on the Water” and “Woman from Tokyo” on its current “Long Goodbye Tour.”

Lucinda Williams will play the State Theatre in Portland on Sept. 17. Photo courtesy of All Eyes Media

Oct. 10 – Vince Gill, 7 p.m., Merrill Auditorium, 20 Myrtle St., Portland, $49.75 to $175, porttix.com. A Country Music Hall of Famer, Gill’s career spans the genre from bluegrass to more mainstream country. Known for his songwriting and his guitar playing, he’ll be on tour promoting his new album, “Okie.”

Oct. 24 – St. Paul & The Broken Bones, 8 p.m., State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland, $37.50 to $40, statetheatreportland.com. A Southern soul band from Alabama, St. Paul & The Broken Bones have released three albums since 2013 and this past year have found themselves on late-night network talk shows and opening for The Rolling Stones. The band is known for its original soul songs and vibrant live shows, complete with a hard-working horn section.

Oct. 24 – Tony Bennett, 7:30 p.m., Merrill Auditorium, 20 Myrtle St., Portland, $70.75 to $170.75 , porttix.com. If you Google the term “American musical legend,” Bennett’s picture will pop up. He’s maybe best known for “I Left My Heart in San Francisco,” but he’s recorded a vast array of standards, starting in the late 1940s. At 93, the jovial crooner keeps winning new audiences, appearing on TV, doing duets with young artists, and touring.


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