Gideon’s climate agenda deserves a look

As Freeport Town Councilor Sara Gideon started with the banning of harmful pesticides in Freeport public green spaces. Now, as she seeks election to the United States Senate she has just released an easy to read Climate Agenda that is not only comprehensive, but gives promise to a future of cleaner air and water for every American.

As important, she will work for the creation of well-paying green jobs that will be the envy of workforces around the world. Her stint as Speaker of the Maine House has continued her commitment to sensible environmental legislation. She has been endorsed by the prestigious League of Conservation Voters, and has earned a lifetime 96% score from the Maine Conservation Voters organization. Sara has three children. For so many of us, our kids are the most important part of our lives. Leaving them a planet that is getting healthier, instead of less hospitable to live in, is a legacy any parent can be proud of. As a gift to your kids please take a moment to visit Sara Gideon’s website and examine her thoughtful Climate Agenda.

Michael Perry and Chris Wolfe,
Freeport

The trouble with isolation

In the Aug. 13 edition of The Times Record, Tom Purcell gave us what I think is an excellent and very relevant commentary; “The longer we’re isolated, the less productive we get.”  I will add to this by saying we can also lose our humanity.

He talked about people working from home during this COVID-19 issue and how being away from the workplace has actually become a problem manifested in different forms.

He spoke about the inability of people to “bond and grow with each other.”  I think this is an extremely important point to make about human relations.  Some people might go an entire lifetime and never bond with anyone and perhaps never bonding with a family member.

This kind of closeness, this acute understanding of oneself and another person is quite extraordinary enabling each person to learn together, to be supportive of each other, to become more conscious, more aware and increasing understanding.

I think what Tom Purcell is also alluding to is that humans cannot isolate themselves for very long without feeling a social inclination to another person or to a larger group of people.

I am concerned with young children during this time of not seeing each other’s face. I ask if parents are acutely aware of children’s concerns and possible fears. Fear can be difficult for adults to deal with! For children to attempt to understand their feelings, their fears, I feel younger people need support and help from older people.  I think we should listen very closely to our youth and ourselves!

Joseph Ciarrocca,
Brunswick

filed under: