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Cassini photographs Saturn

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Associated Press | of | Share this photo

    One of Saturn's moons, Mimas, is dwarfed by the planet's rings.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - Associated Press/NASA | of | Share this photo

    This June 28, 2009, image provided by NASA, taken by the international Cassini spacecraft, shows Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons. NASA's Cassini spacecraft has detected hydrogen molecules in the geysers shooting off the ice-encrusted ocean world, possibly the result of deep-sea chemical reactions between water and rock that could spark microbial life, according to findings announced this month in the journal Science.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/NASA via Associated Press | of | Share this photo

    This combination of images shows features in Saturn's atmosphere from closer than ever before. The view was captured by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft as it became the first spacecraft to venture between Saturn and its rings.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - NASA | of | Share this photo

    An image of Saturn captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft Wednesday shows a gigantic swirling hurricane at the planet's north pole.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - Associated Press/NASA | of | Share this photo

    This image made by the Cassini spacecraft on March 12, 2006, shows two of Saturn's moons, the small Epimetheus and smog-enshrouded Titan, with Saturn's A and F rings stretching across the frame. Launched in 1997, Cassini reached Saturn in 2004 and has been exploring it from orbit ever since. Cassini’s fuel tank is almost empty, so NASA has opted for a risky, but science-rich grand finale.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - Associated Press/NASA | of | Share this photo

    Earth and the moon, center left, appear as small points of light behind the rings of Saturn, in this image captured by the Cassini spacecraft, 870 million miles away from Earth.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - NASA/JPL-Caltech via Associated Press | of | Share this photo

    This is an image from the short film "Cassini's Grand Finale," with the spacecraft diving between Saturn and the planet's innermost ring.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - NASA/JPL-Caltech/Southwest Research Institute via Associated Press | of | Share this photo

    This illustration shows how scientists on the space agency's Cassini mission theorize water interacts with rock at the bottom of the ocean of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus, producing hydrogen gas. The graphic shows water from the ocean circulating through the seafloor, where it is heated and interacts chemically with the rock. This warm water, laden with minerals and dissolved gases (including hydrogen and possibly methane) then pours into the ocean creating chimney-like vents.

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    Cassini photographs Saturn - NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Associated Press | of | Share this photo

    This Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, image shows plumes of gas and dust-sized icy particles, top, emerging from the southern region of Saturn's moon Enceladus as the Cassini spacecraft made a close flyby of the icy moon.

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