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PORTLAND PRESS HERALD DARKROOM
Gallery: Presidents and baseball

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    Gallery: Presidents and baseball - Associated Press, file | of | Share this photo

    President Richard M. Nixon throws out the ceremonial first pitch in Washington on April 7, 1969, as Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, second from left, and Washington Senators manager Ted Williams, far left, watch.

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    President Lyndon Johnson throws out the first pitch to open the American League baseball season April 13, 1964, in Washington. The first pitch ceremony preceded the opening game between the Los Angeles Angels and the Washington Senators. At left is House Speaker John McCormack of Massachusetts.

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    Roosevelt prepares to throw the traditional first pitch in Washington, on April 14, 1936, opening the baseball season with a game between the Senators and the Yankees at Griffith Stadium. From left: Roosevelt's son Elliott; Betsy Cushing Roosevelt, wife of FDR's eldest son, James; the president; Yankees manager Joe McCarthy; and Senators manager Bucky Harris.

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    President Gerald Ford throws the ceremonial first pitch July 13, 1976, to start the Baseball All-Star game in Philadelphia. At right is Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn.

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    President Calvin Coolidge throws out the ball Oct. 4, 1924, for the opening game of the World Series between the Washington Senators and the New York Giants in Washington.

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    President Warren G. Harding throws out the first ball April 13, 1921, to open the Washington Senators' baseball season.

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    President John F. Kennedy throws out the first pitch April 9, 1962, to inaugurate the American League baseball season and DC Stadium in Washington.

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    Clark Griffith, right, president of the Washington Senators, watches President Harry Truman, throw out the first pitch in Washington on April 18, 1949. Griffith holds Truman's arm just before the throw as Connie Mack, manager of the Philadelphia Athletics, watches.

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    President Franklin D. Roosevelt prepares to throw out the ceremonial first pitch Oct. 5, 1933, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, before Game 3 of baseball's World Series as Washington Senators manager Joe Cronin, third from right, and New York Giants manager Bill Terry, second from right, look on. The President uncorked an almost wild throw that sent the players scrambling.

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    Gallery: Presidents and baseball - Nam Y. Huh/Associated Press, file | of | Share this photo

    President Barack Obama throws out the ceremonial first pitch July 14, 2009, during the MLB All-Star baseball game in St. Louis.

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  • baseball, first pitch, president, opening day
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    Gallery: Presidents and baseball - Evan Vucci/Associated Press, file | of | Share this photo

    President George W. Bush throws out the ceremonial first pitch April 14, 2005, at the Washington Nationals home opener in Washington. The Nationals played the Arizona Diamondbacks in the first regular season baseball game in Washington in 34 years.

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