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MPA first place picture story

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    MPA first place picture story - Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    FIRST PLACE, PICTURE STORY: Traditions and trials have been a part of Indian life in Maine for as long as members of the Passamaquoddy tribe, like this elder at Indian Township, can remember. Their ancestors found sustenance in this corner of the world for at least 13,000 years, adapting as eastern Maine turned from tundra to forest. They hunted and fished on land that shaped their lives, right up until outsiders came and took much of it away.​

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    MPA first place picture story - Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Victoria Boston, a full-blooded member of the Passamaquoddy tribe, sits on her porch and reflects on the loss of her daughter who died in a tragic accident this past winter. Boston lost her job in the tribal government and she believes it is because she clashed with tribal leadership.

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    MPA first place picture story - Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    An antique truck steers past the Custom House in Eastport early in the morning in this image taken with a pinhole camera. Some leaders and residents of the nation’s easternmost city – and elsewhere in Maine – took steps to retaliate against a young attorney when he began to represent the Indians in the mid-1960s.

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    MPA first place picture story - Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ira Gilbert, a Passamaquoddy tribal member, eats a frozen meal of salisbury steaks for dinner that he split evenly with each of his three dogs. Gilbert and his dogs live in a small trailer with no running water and spotty electricity that he borrows from a now closed military apparel factory.

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    MPA first place picture story - Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Passamaquoddy tribal elder Allen Sockabasin stands on Split Rock at the Pleasant Point Indian Reservation. Split rock is of great spiritual significance to the Passamaquoddy people.

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    MPA first place picture story - Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Vera Francis, a Passamaquoddy tribal activist, poses for a portrait in her office at the tribal government building on the Pleasant Point reservation.

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    MPA first place picture story - Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    A dog chained to a trailer on Passamaquoddy tribal land, as seen in this pinhole image.

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