Sign In:


PORTLAND PRESS HERALD DARKROOM
Richard Overton, oldest living American

/

Helpful tips...

esc button

Use the LEFT / RIGHT keys to navigate the Darkroom

esc button

Use the UP key to show captions

esc button

Use the DOWN key to hide captions

esc button

Use the ESC key to close Darkroom

Find other amazing Darkroom photos below

X
  • Hide
    Richard Overton, oldest living American - Washington Post/Jahi Chikwendiu | of | Share this photo

    Richard Overton, on the cusp of turning 112, grew up hearing his grandfather's stories of being a slave in Tennessee. When his grandfather was freed, he moved to Texas, where his family settled.

    Show
  • Hide
    Richard Overton, oldest living American - U.S. Army photo | of | Share this photo

    Richard Arvin Overton, in his Army uniform in the 1940s. He was inducted on Sept. 3, 1940, at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and served in the South Pacific throughout the war, including stops in Hawaii, Guam, Palau and Iwo Jima. He left the Army in October 1945 as a technician fifth grade.

    Show
  • Hide
    Richard Overton, oldest living American - Washington Post/Jahi Chikwendiu | of | Share this photo

    Richard Overton fulfills his dream of visiting the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., ahead of his upcoming 112th birthday.

    Show
  • Hide
    Richard Overton, oldest living American - Washington Post/Jahi Chikwendiu | of | Share this photo

    Richard Overton, believed to be the oldest living American and the third-oldest person in the world, tours the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

    Show
  • Hide
    Richard Overton, oldest living American - Washington Post/Jahi Chikwendiu | of | Share this photo

    Richard Overton is presented with a birthday cake at the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

    Show
  • Hide
    Richard Overton, oldest living American - Washington Post/Jahi Chikwendiu | of | Share this photo

    Richard Overton watches a video of former President Barack Obama during a visit to the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Sunday. Overton has been to the White House several times and met Obama. When he came across the exhibit featuring Obama, he sat up a little taller in his wheelchair. "Yes, sir!" he said. "That's my friend."

    Show